The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home

Paul Stamets. The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home. - Agarikon press, 1983

Содержание

FOREWORD by Dr. Andrew Weil

PREFACE

I. INTRODUCTION TO MUSHROOM CULTURE

II. STERILE TECHNIQUE AND AGAR CULTURE

III. GRAIN CULTURE

IV. THE MUSHROOM GROWING ROOM

V. COMPOST PREPARATION

VI. NON-COMPOSTED SUBSTRATES

VII. SPAWNING AND SPAWN RUNNING IN BULK SUBSTRATES

VIII. THE CASING LAYER

IX. STRATEGIES FOR MUSHROOM FORMATION (PINHEAD INITIATION)

X. ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS: SUSTAINING THE MUSHROOM CROP

XL GROWING PARAMETERS FOR VARIOUS MUSHROOM SPECIES

XII. CULTIVATION PROBLEMS AND THEIR SOLUTIONS: A TROUBLESHOOTING GUIDE

XIII. THE CONTAMINANTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE: IDENTIFICATION AND CONTROL

XIV. THE PESTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE

XV. MUSHROOM GENETICS

APPENDICES

GLOSSARY

BIBLIOGRAPHY

INDEX

PHOTOGRAPHY AND ILLUSTRATION CREDITS

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

OCR
84/The Mushroom Cultivator

Pre-wettea raw maierials in a windrow.
Compost microorganisms can be divided into two classes according to their oxygen requirements. Those needing oxygen to live and grow are called Aerobes while those living in the absence of oxygen are called Anaerobes. Each class has well defined characteristics.
1. Aerobes decompose organic matter rapidly and completely with a corresponding production of C02, water and heat. This heat generation is called Thermogenesis.
2. Anaerobes partially decompose organic matter, producing not only CO2 and water, but
also certain organic acids and several types of gases such as hydrogen sulfide and methane.
Anaerobes generate less heat than aerobes.
Examination of anaerobic areas of the compost reveals a yellowish, under-composted material
that smells like rotten eggs. These areas in a compost pile are noticeably cooler and generally water-

logged. Anaerobic compost is unsuitable for mushroom growth.
Since neither fresh horse manure nor straw based synthetics have the correct moisture content,
water must be added to these materials. The recommended levels for optimum composting are:

Horse manure: 69-71%

Synthetic: 71-73%

P re-wetting
As long as the composting ingredients remain dry, the microorganisms lie dormant and cornposting does not take place. The first step in the composting process is the initial watering of the
starting materials. The purpose of this pre-composting or pre-wetting is to activate the microbes.

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