The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home

Paul Stamets. The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home. - Agarikon press, 1983

Содержание

FOREWORD by Dr. Andrew Weil

PREFACE

I. INTRODUCTION TO MUSHROOM CULTURE

II. STERILE TECHNIQUE AND AGAR CULTURE

III. GRAIN CULTURE

IV. THE MUSHROOM GROWING ROOM

V. COMPOST PREPARATION

VI. NON-COMPOSTED SUBSTRATES

VII. SPAWNING AND SPAWN RUNNING IN BULK SUBSTRATES

VIII. THE CASING LAYER

IX. STRATEGIES FOR MUSHROOM FORMATION (PINHEAD INITIATION)

X. ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS: SUSTAINING THE MUSHROOM CROP

XL GROWING PARAMETERS FOR VARIOUS MUSHROOM SPECIES

XII. CULTIVATION PROBLEMS AND THEIR SOLUTIONS: A TROUBLESHOOTING GUIDE

XIII. THE CONTAMINANTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE: IDENTIFICATION AND CONTROL

XIV. THE PESTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE

XV. MUSHROOM GENETICS

APPENDICES

GLOSSARY

BIBLIOGRAPHY

INDEX

PHOTOGRAPHY AND ILLUSTRATION CREDITS

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

OCR
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66/The Mushroom Cultivator

Figure 68 Sinden system
tray. The tray can be constructed of 1 x 6 or 2 x 6 inch

lumber for bottom and side
boards and 4 x 4 inch corner
posts. (1 x 8 or 2 x 8 inch side
boards are suggested for



deep fills).

stricted environment outside the actual growing room. The tray system also gives the cultivator
more control over hygiene and improves the efficiency of the operation. Moving trays from room to
room does present contamination possibilities; therefore, the operations room must also be clean
and fly tight for spawning and casing. Because there is no fixed framework in the growing room, it is
easily cleaned and disinfected.
The tray method has many distinct advantages over the mason jar method for home cultivators

preferring to fruit mushrooms on sterilized grain. These advantages are: fewer necessary spawn
containers; fewer aborts due to uncontrolled primordia formation between the glass/grain interface;
ease of picking and watering; better ratio of surface area to grain depth; and comparatively higher
yields on the first and second flushes. An inexpensive tray is the 3-4 inch deep plant propagation flat

commonly sold for staring seedlings. An example of such a tray is pictured in Fig. 69.

THE ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL SYSTEM
The mushroom growing room is designed to maintain a selected temperature range at high relative humidities. This is accomplished through adequate insulation and an environmental control
system with provisions for heating, cooling, humidification and air handling.
In the original shelf houses the environment was controlled by a combination of active and
passive means. Fresh air was introduced through adjustable vents running the length of the ceiling
above the center aisle. Heat was supplied by a hot water pipe along the side walls, a foot above
ground level. And humidity was controlled by similarly placed piping carrying live steam. The warm
air rising up the walls in combination with the cool fresh air falling down the center aisle created convection currents for air circulation. Although no longer in general use by Agaricus growers, air
movement based on convection can be similarly designed for small growth chambers where mechanical means are inappropriate.
Present day Agaricus farms integrate heating, cooling and humidification equipment into the
air handling system and in this way are able to achieve balanced conditions throughout the growing
room. Figure 73 shows an example of this type of system.

Fresh Air
Filtered fresh air enters the room at the mixing box where it is proportionally regulated with re-

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