The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home

Paul Stamets. The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home. - Agarikon press, 1983

Содержание

FOREWORD by Dr. Andrew Weil

PREFACE

I. INTRODUCTION TO MUSHROOM CULTURE

II. STERILE TECHNIQUE AND AGAR CULTURE

III. GRAIN CULTURE

IV. THE MUSHROOM GROWING ROOM

V. COMPOST PREPARATION

VI. NON-COMPOSTED SUBSTRATES

VII. SPAWNING AND SPAWN RUNNING IN BULK SUBSTRATES

VIII. THE CASING LAYER

IX. STRATEGIES FOR MUSHROOM FORMATION (PINHEAD INITIATION)

X. ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS: SUSTAINING THE MUSHROOM CROP

XL GROWING PARAMETERS FOR VARIOUS MUSHROOM SPECIES

XII. CULTIVATION PROBLEMS AND THEIR SOLUTIONS: A TROUBLESHOOTING GUIDE

XIII. THE CONTAMINANTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE: IDENTIFICATION AND CONTROL

XIV. THE PESTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE

XV. MUSHROOM GENETICS

APPENDICES

GLOSSARY

BIBLIOGRAPHY

INDEX

PHOTOGRAPHY AND ILLUSTRATION CREDITS

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

OCR
The Mushroom Growing Room/65

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Figure 67 Double support and centerpole design shelves. Both shelves are firmly attached to the floor and the ceiling.
units come in a variety of widths and lengths and have the distinct advantage of being impervious to
disease growth. Their use is particularly appropriate for cropping on sterilized substrates in small
containers.

Trays
The development of the tray system in Agaricus culture is largely due to the work of Dr. James
Sinden. In direct contrast to anchored static shelves, trays are individual cropping units that have the
distinct advantage of being mobile. This mobility has made mechanization of commercial cutlivation
possible. Automated tray lines are capable of filling, spawning and casing in less time, with fewer
people and with better quality management.
Whereas in the shelf system all stages of the cultural cycle occur in the same room, the tray system utilizes a separate room for Phase II composting. On a commercial tray farm only the Phase II
room is equipped for steaming and high velocity air movement.

A Sinden system tray design is shown in Figure 68. This tray has short legs in the up-position.
During Phase II and spawn running these trays are stacked 1 5 cm. apart and tightly placed within
the room to fully utilize compost heat. After casing, a wooden spacer is inserted between the trays
for crop management, increasing the space to 25-35 cm. Other tray designs have longer legs in the
down position and higher sideboards to accomodate more compost. These frays are similarly
spaced throughout the cycle. In the growing room, trays can be stacked 3-6 high in evenly spaced
rows. The main considerations for the home cultivator are that the trays can be easily handled and
that they fit the floor space of the room.
The real advantage of the tray system is the ability to fill, spawn and case single units in an unre-

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