The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home

Paul Stamets. The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home. - Agarikon press, 1983

Содержание

FOREWORD by Dr. Andrew Weil

PREFACE

I. INTRODUCTION TO MUSHROOM CULTURE

II. STERILE TECHNIQUE AND AGAR CULTURE

III. GRAIN CULTURE

IV. THE MUSHROOM GROWING ROOM

V. COMPOST PREPARATION

VI. NON-COMPOSTED SUBSTRATES

VII. SPAWNING AND SPAWN RUNNING IN BULK SUBSTRATES

VIII. THE CASING LAYER

IX. STRATEGIES FOR MUSHROOM FORMATION (PINHEAD INITIATION)

X. ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS: SUSTAINING THE MUSHROOM CROP

XL GROWING PARAMETERS FOR VARIOUS MUSHROOM SPECIES

XII. CULTIVATION PROBLEMS AND THEIR SOLUTIONS: A TROUBLESHOOTING GUIDE

XIII. THE CONTAMINANTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE: IDENTIFICATION AND CONTROL

XIV. THE PESTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE

XV. MUSHROOM GENETICS

APPENDICES

GLOSSARY

BIBLIOGRAPHY

INDEX

PHOTOGRAPHY AND ILLUSTRATION CREDITS

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

OCR
Grain Culture/51
to two and a half weeks to colonize grain while Psi/ocybe cubensis grows through in a week to ten
days. Here again, the use of the fire as a striking surface can be an aid to shaking. For slower growing species, a common shaking schedule is on the 5th and 9th days after inoculation. The cultures

should be incubated in a semi-sterile environment at the temperature most appropriate for the
species being cultivated. (See Chapter Xl).
After transferring mycelium from agar to grain, further transfers can be conducted from these
grain cultures to even more grain filled jars. A schedule of successive transfers from the first inoculated grain jar, designated C-i, through two more "generations" of transfers (C-2, G-3 respectively) will result in an exponential expansion of mycelial mass. If for instance, 1 0 jars were inoculated

from an agar grown culture (C-i), they could further inoculate 100 jars (C-2) which in turn could
go into i 000 jars (C-3). As one can see, it is of critical importance that the first set of spawn masters
be absolutely pure for it may ultimately inoculate as many as 1,000 jars! Inoculations beyond the
third generation of transfers are not recommended. Indeed, if a contamination rate above 1 0% is experienced at the second generation of transfers, then consider C-2 a terminal stage. These cultures
can inoculate bulk substrates or be laid out in trays, cased and fruited.

Grain-to-grain transfers are one of the most efficient methods of spawn making. This method is
preferred by most commercial spawn laboratories specializing in Agaricus culture. They in turn sell
grain spawn that is a second or third transfer to Agaricus farmers who use this to impregnate their
compost. For the creation of large quantities of spawn, the grain-to-grain technique is far superior to
agar-to-grain for both its ease and speed. However, every cultivator must ultimately return to agar
culture in order to maintain the purity of the strain.

Figure 52a Spawn master
ready for transfer.

Figure 52b Spawn master
after shaking.

Figure 52c Inoculating
sterilized grain from spawn
master.

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