The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home

Paul Stamets. The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home. - Agarikon press, 1983

Содержание

FOREWORD by Dr. Andrew Weil

PREFACE

I. INTRODUCTION TO MUSHROOM CULTURE

II. STERILE TECHNIQUE AND AGAR CULTURE

III. GRAIN CULTURE

IV. THE MUSHROOM GROWING ROOM

V. COMPOST PREPARATION

VI. NON-COMPOSTED SUBSTRATES

VII. SPAWNING AND SPAWN RUNNING IN BULK SUBSTRATES

VIII. THE CASING LAYER

IX. STRATEGIES FOR MUSHROOM FORMATION (PINHEAD INITIATION)

X. ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS: SUSTAINING THE MUSHROOM CROP

XL GROWING PARAMETERS FOR VARIOUS MUSHROOM SPECIES

XII. CULTIVATION PROBLEMS AND THEIR SOLUTIONS: A TROUBLESHOOTING GUIDE

XIII. THE CONTAMINANTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE: IDENTIFICATION AND CONTROL

XIV. THE PESTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE

XV. MUSHROOM GENETICS

APPENDICES

GLOSSARY

BIBLIOGRAPHY

INDEX

PHOTOGRAPHY AND ILLUSTRATION CREDITS

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

OCR
Sterile Technique and Agar Culture/39
Although a strain may be preserved over the long term using this method, will it be as productive as when it was first stored? Other studies have concluded that strains saved for more than 5
years under mineral oil showed distinct signs of degeneration while these same strains were just as
productive at 2½ years as the day they were preserved. Nevertheless, it is not unreasonable to

presume, based on these studies, that cultures can be stored up to two years without serious
impairment to their vitality.
Four other methods of preservation include: the immersion of slants into liquid nitrogen (an expensive procedure); the inoculation of washed sterilized horse manure/straw compost that is then
kept at 36-38 F. (See Chapter V on compost preparation); the inoculation of sawdust/bran media
for wood decomposers (see section in Chapter III on alternative spawn media); or saving spores
aceptically under refrigerated conditions—perhaps the simplest method for home cultivators.

Whatever method is used, remember that the mushroom's nature is to fruit, sporulate and
evolve. Cultivation techniques should evolve with the mushroom and the cultivator must selectively
isolate and maintain promising strains as they develop. So don't be too surprised if five years down
the line a stored strain poorly resembles the original in its fruiting potential or form.

Figure 43

Culture slant of healthy mycelium

ready for cool storage.

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