The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home

Paul Stamets. The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home. - Agarikon press, 1983

Содержание

FOREWORD by Dr. Andrew Weil

PREFACE

I. INTRODUCTION TO MUSHROOM CULTURE

II. STERILE TECHNIQUE AND AGAR CULTURE

III. GRAIN CULTURE

IV. THE MUSHROOM GROWING ROOM

V. COMPOST PREPARATION

VI. NON-COMPOSTED SUBSTRATES

VII. SPAWNING AND SPAWN RUNNING IN BULK SUBSTRATES

VIII. THE CASING LAYER

IX. STRATEGIES FOR MUSHROOM FORMATION (PINHEAD INITIATION)

X. ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS: SUSTAINING THE MUSHROOM CROP

XL GROWING PARAMETERS FOR VARIOUS MUSHROOM SPECIES

XII. CULTIVATION PROBLEMS AND THEIR SOLUTIONS: A TROUBLESHOOTING GUIDE

XIII. THE CONTAMINANTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE: IDENTIFICATION AND CONTROL

XIV. THE PESTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE

XV. MUSHROOM GENETICS

APPENDICES

GLOSSARY

BIBLIOGRAPHY

INDEX

PHOTOGRAPHY AND ILLUSTRATION CREDITS

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

OCR
24/The Mushroom Cultivator

Figure 24b Taking a spore print on a sterile petri
dish and on glass microscope slides.

Figure 25

Sterilizing two scalpels speeds up

agar transfer technique.
Agaricus brunnescens, Psilocybe cubensis and many other mushroom species have a partial
veil—a thin layer of tissue extending from the cap margin to the stem. This veil can be an aid in the
procurement of nearly contaminant-free spores. The veil seals the gill from the outside, creating a
semi-sterile chamber from which spores can be removed with little danger of contamination. By
choosing a healthy, young specimen with the veil intact, and then by carefully removing the veil
tissue under aseptic conditions, a nearly pure spore print is obtained. This is the ideal way to start a
multispore culture.

Techniques for Spore Germination
Once a spore print is obtained, mushroom culture can begin. Sterilize an inoculating loop or
scalpel by holding it over the flame of an alcohol lamp or butane torch for five or ten seconds until it
is red hot. (If a butane torch is used, turn it down to the lowest possible setting to minimize air disturbance). Cool the tip by inserting it into the sterile media in a petri dish and scrape some spores off
the print. Transfer the spores by streaking the tip of the transfer tool across the agar surface. A similar method calls for scraping the spore print above an opened petri dish and allowing them to freefall onto the medium. When starting a new culture from spores, it is best to inoculate at least three
media dishes to improve the chances of getting a successful germination. Mycelium started in this

manner is called a multispore culture.
When first produced, spores are moist, inflated cells with a relatively high rate of germination.
As time passes, they dry, collapse at their centers and can not easily germinate. The probability of
germinating dehydrated spores increases by soaking them in sterilized water. For 30 minutes at 1 5
psi, sterilize an eye dropper or similar device (syringe or pipette) and a water filled test tube or

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