The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home

Paul Stamets. The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home. - Agarikon press, 1983

Содержание

FOREWORD by Dr. Andrew Weil

PREFACE

I. INTRODUCTION TO MUSHROOM CULTURE

II. STERILE TECHNIQUE AND AGAR CULTURE

III. GRAIN CULTURE

IV. THE MUSHROOM GROWING ROOM

V. COMPOST PREPARATION

VI. NON-COMPOSTED SUBSTRATES

VII. SPAWNING AND SPAWN RUNNING IN BULK SUBSTRATES

VIII. THE CASING LAYER

IX. STRATEGIES FOR MUSHROOM FORMATION (PINHEAD INITIATION)

X. ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS: SUSTAINING THE MUSHROOM CROP

XL GROWING PARAMETERS FOR VARIOUS MUSHROOM SPECIES

XII. CULTIVATION PROBLEMS AND THEIR SOLUTIONS: A TROUBLESHOOTING GUIDE

XIII. THE CONTAMINANTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE: IDENTIFICATION AND CONTROL

XIV. THE PESTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE

XV. MUSHROOM GENETICS

APPENDICES

GLOSSARY

BIBLIOGRAPHY

INDEX

PHOTOGRAPHY AND ILLUSTRATION CREDITS

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

OCR
Sterile Technique and Agar Culture/23

STARTING A CULTURE FROM SPORES
A mushroom culture can be started in one of two ways. Most growers start a culture from

spores. The advantage of using spores is that they are viable for weeks to months after the mushroom has decomposed. The other way of obtaining a culture is to cut a piece of interior tissue from
a live specimen, in effect a clone. Tissue cultures must be taken within a day or two from the time
the mushroom has been picked, after which a healthy clone becomes increasingly difficult to establish.

Taking a Spore Print
To collect spores, sever the cap from the stem of a fresh, well cleaned mushroom and place it
gills down on a piece of clean white paper or a clean glass surface such as a microscope slide. If a
specimen is partially dried, add a drop or two of water to the cap surface to aid in the release of
spores. To lessen evaporation and disturbance from air currents, place a cup or glass over the
mushroom cap. After a few hours, the spores will have fallen according to the radiating symmetry of
the gills. If the spore print has been taken on paper, cut it out, fold it in half, seal in an airtight container and label the print with the date, species and collection number. When using microscope
slides, the spores can be sandwiched between two pieces of glass and taped along the edges to
prevent the entry of contaminant spores. A spore print carelessly taken or stored can easily become
contaminated, decreasing the chance of acquiring a pure culture.

Figure 24a

Taking a spore print on typing paper.

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