The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home

Paul Stamets. The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home. - Agarikon press, 1983

Содержание

FOREWORD by Dr. Andrew Weil

PREFACE

I. INTRODUCTION TO MUSHROOM CULTURE

II. STERILE TECHNIQUE AND AGAR CULTURE

III. GRAIN CULTURE

IV. THE MUSHROOM GROWING ROOM

V. COMPOST PREPARATION

VI. NON-COMPOSTED SUBSTRATES

VII. SPAWNING AND SPAWN RUNNING IN BULK SUBSTRATES

VIII. THE CASING LAYER

IX. STRATEGIES FOR MUSHROOM FORMATION (PINHEAD INITIATION)

X. ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS: SUSTAINING THE MUSHROOM CROP

XL GROWING PARAMETERS FOR VARIOUS MUSHROOM SPECIES

XII. CULTIVATION PROBLEMS AND THEIR SOLUTIONS: A TROUBLESHOOTING GUIDE

XIII. THE CONTAMINANTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE: IDENTIFICATION AND CONTROL

XIV. THE PESTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE

XV. MUSHROOM GENETICS

APPENDICES

GLOSSARY

BIBLIOGRAPHY

INDEX

PHOTOGRAPHY AND ILLUSTRATION CREDITS

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

OCR
332/Pests of Mushroom Cufture

Figure 238 Mycophagous eelworm (top) and Saprophagous eelworm. Note stylet in
mouth tube of former.
eelworms to breed and feed. And, as their population increases, the build-up of waste material
from metabolic excretions soon fouls the substrate, rendering it unsuitable for mycelial growth.
These excretions result in similar damage to infested casing soils.
Although saprophagous eelworms are not primary pathogens, their presence indicates improper hygiene or imbalanced growing conditions. For this reason, control measures focus on
prevention rather than treatment. In fact, there are no practical means to treat infested areas that
would not likewise harm the mushroom mycelium.

Mycophagous Nematodes
Genus/Species: Ditylench us myceliophagus; Aphelenchiodes composticola
Mycophagous eelworms feed directly on mushrooms. They are characterized by a mouth
stylet or needle with which these eelworms puncture hyphae, inject digestive juices and then suck
out the cellular contents. The damaged cell, drained of its cytoplasm, soon dies. Feeding continually and moving from cell to cell, mycophagous eelworms can soon destroy whole mycelial networks. In infected substrates, the fine mycelial growth disappears, leaving only the coarse strands
which give the appearance of stringy growth. Eventually the substrate becomes soggy and foul
smelling, a condition further promoted by the build-up of anaerobic bacteria. Often the nematode
trapping fungi,
spp. develop in association with them. It is visible as a fine grayish
mold-like growth. Although the presence of this mold is a useful indicator of nematode infestation, it
is not a true control for these organisms.
Mycophages differ from saprophages in their slower non-parthogenetic reproduction and their

lack of the "winking" behavior mentioned earlier. Both Mycophagus species can reproduce
30-100 fold in about two weeks at 70-75°F.

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