The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home

Paul Stamets. The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home. - Agarikon press, 1983

Содержание

FOREWORD by Dr. Andrew Weil

PREFACE

I. INTRODUCTION TO MUSHROOM CULTURE

II. STERILE TECHNIQUE AND AGAR CULTURE

III. GRAIN CULTURE

IV. THE MUSHROOM GROWING ROOM

V. COMPOST PREPARATION

VI. NON-COMPOSTED SUBSTRATES

VII. SPAWNING AND SPAWN RUNNING IN BULK SUBSTRATES

VIII. THE CASING LAYER

IX. STRATEGIES FOR MUSHROOM FORMATION (PINHEAD INITIATION)

X. ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS: SUSTAINING THE MUSHROOM CROP

XL GROWING PARAMETERS FOR VARIOUS MUSHROOM SPECIES

XII. CULTIVATION PROBLEMS AND THEIR SOLUTIONS: A TROUBLESHOOTING GUIDE

XIII. THE CONTAMINANTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE: IDENTIFICATION AND CONTROL

XIV. THE PESTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE

XV. MUSHROOM GENETICS

APPENDICES

GLOSSARY

BIBLIOGRAPHY

INDEX

PHOTOGRAPHY AND ILLUSTRATION CREDITS

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

OCR
306/The Mushroom Cultivator

SEPEDONIUM
Class: Fungi Imperfecti

Order: Monilia/es
Series: Aleurisporae

Common Names: Yellow Mold; White
Mold.

Habitat and Frequency of Occurrence:
Occasionally to frequently encountered on
agar; more common on compost; and parasitic on wild mushrooms (both Basidiomycetes and Ascomycetes).

Medium Through Which Contamination Is Spread: Primarily through the air,

Figure 222 Drawing of sporulating structure and flask shaped conidia.

but also from spent compost.

Methods of Control: Air filtration;

strict

maintenance of hygiene in the laboratory and
growing room; the expeditious removal of spent compost; and the thorough disinfection of wooden
compost containers.

Macroscopic Appearance: On malt agar and on rye grain appearing as a fast growing whitish
mold, very similar to cottony mushroom mycelia and frequently mistaken for it. On compost it is a
fine white mold which with age becomes yellowish to golden yellow from spore production. It is not
as prolific a spore producer as the powdery Trichoderma. If spores are not produced at all, the mycelia remains whitish. This mold attacks composts that otherwise have been properly prepared for
mushroom growing.

Microscopic Characteristics: Two types of spores formed. The more obvious are large, globose
chlamydospores ornamented with short spines and similar to those of Mycogone; except in this
genus a hemispheric foot cell, shaped like a teacup is absent. Conidiophores are simple, relatively
undeveloped, resembling mushroom mycelium and not easily distinguished from it except that they
lack clamps. Globose to vase shaped conidia develop terminally at the end of these branches, either
singly or in loose clusters.

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