The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home

Paul Stamets. The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home. - Agarikon press, 1983

Содержание

FOREWORD by Dr. Andrew Weil

PREFACE

I. INTRODUCTION TO MUSHROOM CULTURE

II. STERILE TECHNIQUE AND AGAR CULTURE

III. GRAIN CULTURE

IV. THE MUSHROOM GROWING ROOM

V. COMPOST PREPARATION

VI. NON-COMPOSTED SUBSTRATES

VII. SPAWNING AND SPAWN RUNNING IN BULK SUBSTRATES

VIII. THE CASING LAYER

IX. STRATEGIES FOR MUSHROOM FORMATION (PINHEAD INITIATION)

X. ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS: SUSTAINING THE MUSHROOM CROP

XL GROWING PARAMETERS FOR VARIOUS MUSHROOM SPECIES

XII. CULTIVATION PROBLEMS AND THEIR SOLUTIONS: A TROUBLESHOOTING GUIDE

XIII. THE CONTAMINANTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE: IDENTIFICATION AND CONTROL

XIV. THE PESTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE

XV. MUSHROOM GENETICS

APPENDICES

GLOSSARY

BIBLIOGRAPHY

INDEX

PHOTOGRAPHY AND ILLUSTRATION CREDITS

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

OCR
300/The Mushroom Cultivator

PENICJLLIUM
Class: Fungi Imperlecti
Order: Moniliales
Family: Euro tiaceae

Common Name: The Bluish Green Mold.
Latin Root: From "penicillum" meaning a
brush-like tuft of hairs, so named in reference
to the shape of the sporulating body.

Habitat & Frequency of Occurrence: An
extremely common contaminant. Although
not as prevalent in nature as Cladosporium,
Penicillium is the most prevalent of indoor
contaminants, a fact that is undoubtedly related to human eating habits. Penicillium
species abound on foodstuffs such as fruits,

Figure 217 Drawing of sporulating structure characteristic of Penicillium molds.

cheeses and stored grains. Many species prefer habitats with an acid pH. Penicillia are occasional to frequent on under-developed

mushroom compost, casing soil and on discarded mushroom debris.

Medium Through Which Contamination Is Spread: Primarily through the air, although stored
grain and other foodstuffs, as well as humans are the most frequent carriers of this mold.
Measures of Control: Air filtration; removal of waste products; isolation of contaminated cultures;
and maintenance of a high level of hygiene.

Macroscopic Appearance: Appearing as a granular or powdery bluish green mold, often with a
broad whitish rim of new growth. Some species, less frequently encountered, are whitish, yellowish
or even reddish in color. Many species exude droplets of fluid from their surfaces having antibiotic
properties.

Microscopic Characteristics: Conidiophores arising singly, long, and branching near the apex
into short chains of globose, green, dry conidia. Compared to mushroom spores, the conidia of
Penicillia are minute, measuring only 2-4 microns in diameter.
History, Use and/or Medical Implications: In 1928-1929 while Dr. Alexander Fleming was
studying Staphylococcus aureus, he noticed that a green mold contaminant inhibited his cultured

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