The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home

Paul Stamets. The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home. - Agarikon press, 1983

Содержание

FOREWORD by Dr. Andrew Weil

PREFACE

I. INTRODUCTION TO MUSHROOM CULTURE

II. STERILE TECHNIQUE AND AGAR CULTURE

III. GRAIN CULTURE

IV. THE MUSHROOM GROWING ROOM

V. COMPOST PREPARATION

VI. NON-COMPOSTED SUBSTRATES

VII. SPAWNING AND SPAWN RUNNING IN BULK SUBSTRATES

VIII. THE CASING LAYER

IX. STRATEGIES FOR MUSHROOM FORMATION (PINHEAD INITIATION)

X. ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS: SUSTAINING THE MUSHROOM CROP

XL GROWING PARAMETERS FOR VARIOUS MUSHROOM SPECIES

XII. CULTIVATION PROBLEMS AND THEIR SOLUTIONS: A TROUBLESHOOTING GUIDE

XIII. THE CONTAMINANTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE: IDENTIFICATION AND CONTROL

XIV. THE PESTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE

XV. MUSHROOM GENETICS

APPENDICES

GLOSSARY

BIBLIOGRAPHY

INDEX

PHOTOGRAPHY AND ILLUSTRATION CREDITS

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

OCR
18/The Mushroom Cultivator
and is sometimes equipped with rubber gloves into which the cultivator inserts his hands.
Often, in place of gloves, the front face is covered with a removable cotton cloth that is periodically sterilized. The main advantage of a glove box is that it provides an inexpensive, easily cleaned area where culture work can take place with little or no air movement.

3. Modern laboratories solve the problem of airborne contamination by installing High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters. These filters screeen out all particulates exceeding
0.1 -0.3 microns in diameter, smaller than the spores of all fungi and practically all bacteria.
HEPA filters are built into what is commonly known as a laminar flow hood. Some sterile
laboratories have an entire wall or ceiling constructed of HEPA filters through which pressurized air is forced from the outside. In effect, positive pressure, sterile environment is

created. Specific data regarding the building and design of laminar flow systems is discussed in greater detail in Appendix IV.
Some cultivators have few problems with contaminants while working in what seems like the
most primitive conditions. Others encounter pronounced contamination levels and have to invest in
high technology controls. Each circumstance dictates an appropriate couriter-measure. Whether
one is a home cultivator or a spawn maker in a commercial laboratory, the problems encountered

are similar, differing not in kind, but in degree.

Figure 19 Aero-disinfector for reducing
contaminant spore load in laboratory.

Figure 20

Laminar flow hood.

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