The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home

Paul Stamets. The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home. - Agarikon press, 1983

Содержание

FOREWORD by Dr. Andrew Weil

PREFACE

I. INTRODUCTION TO MUSHROOM CULTURE

II. STERILE TECHNIQUE AND AGAR CULTURE

III. GRAIN CULTURE

IV. THE MUSHROOM GROWING ROOM

V. COMPOST PREPARATION

VI. NON-COMPOSTED SUBSTRATES

VII. SPAWNING AND SPAWN RUNNING IN BULK SUBSTRATES

VIII. THE CASING LAYER

IX. STRATEGIES FOR MUSHROOM FORMATION (PINHEAD INITIATION)

X. ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS: SUSTAINING THE MUSHROOM CROP

XL GROWING PARAMETERS FOR VARIOUS MUSHROOM SPECIES

XII. CULTIVATION PROBLEMS AND THEIR SOLUTIONS: A TROUBLESHOOTING GUIDE

XIII. THE CONTAMINANTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE: IDENTIFICATION AND CONTROL

XIV. THE PESTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE

XV. MUSHROOM GENETICS

APPENDICES

GLOSSARY

BIBLIOGRAPHY

INDEX

PHOTOGRAPHY AND ILLUSTRATION CREDITS

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

OCR
294/The Mushroom Cultivator

MYCOGONE
Class: Fungi Imperlecti

Order: Monilia/es
Family: Hyphomycefeae

Common Names: Bubble; Wet Bubble;
White Mushroom Mold; and La Mole.

Greek Root: From "myco" or fungal and
the suffix "gone" meaning reproductive
body. This mold is named in reference to this
mold's tendency to parasitize the mushroom
fruitbody.

Habitat & Frequency of Occurrence:
Very common, infecting the mushroom itself
and causing significant losses to crops.

Mycogone naturally occurs

Figure 212

Drawing of sporulating struc-

ture characteristic of Myco gone.

in

soils from

which this aggressive contaminant atfacks the
mushroom fruitbody. It does not grow well at

temperatures lower than 60°F.

Medium Through Which Contamination Is Spread: Mostly through soils; debris (stem butts,
etc.); and spent compost. Workers, especially harvesters, are one of the primary vehicles for spore
dispersal. Watering infected areas further spreads this contaminant.
Measures of Control: Use of clean casing materials; moderation of temperature and adhering to a
strict regimen of hygiene, especially between cropping cycles. Without touching the casing, infected
mushrooms should be removed from the bed. The localized area is then sprinkled with salt, baking
soda or a similar alkalinic substance. Do not water until the infected area is treated.
Macroscopic Appearance: Appearing as a whitish mold attacking primordia and turning them
into a soft whitish ball of mycelia. From the brown and rotting interior of these "bubbles", amber

fluid containing spores and bacteria ooze. More mature mushrooms that are afflicted with this disease have a felt-like covering of mycelium and a disproportionately small cap relative to the size of
the stem.

Microscopic Characteristics: Conidiophores short; generally hyaline; relatively undeveloped; lateral; and altogether similar to the mycelia. Two types of conidia, terminally produced, can occur.
The first and most distinctive type of chlamydospore is dark, round and two celled with one being

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