The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home

Paul Stamets. The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home. - Agarikon press, 1983

Содержание

FOREWORD by Dr. Andrew Weil

PREFACE

I. INTRODUCTION TO MUSHROOM CULTURE

II. STERILE TECHNIQUE AND AGAR CULTURE

III. GRAIN CULTURE

IV. THE MUSHROOM GROWING ROOM

V. COMPOST PREPARATION

VI. NON-COMPOSTED SUBSTRATES

VII. SPAWNING AND SPAWN RUNNING IN BULK SUBSTRATES

VIII. THE CASING LAYER

IX. STRATEGIES FOR MUSHROOM FORMATION (PINHEAD INITIATION)

X. ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS: SUSTAINING THE MUSHROOM CROP

XL GROWING PARAMETERS FOR VARIOUS MUSHROOM SPECIES

XII. CULTIVATION PROBLEMS AND THEIR SOLUTIONS: A TROUBLESHOOTING GUIDE

XIII. THE CONTAMINANTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE: IDENTIFICATION AND CONTROL

XIV. THE PESTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE

XV. MUSHROOM GENETICS

APPENDICES

GLOSSARY

BIBLIOGRAPHY

INDEX

PHOTOGRAPHY AND ILLUSTRATION CREDITS

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

OCR
292/The Mushroom Cultivator

MYCELIA STERILIA
Class: Fungi imperlecti

Order: Mycelia Sterilia
Common Name: White Mold.

Habitat and Frequency of Occurrence:
Contaminants fitting into this order occasionally encountered in sterile culture.

Medium Through Which Contamination
Is Spread: Hyphal fragments airborne.

Measures of Control: General hygienic
procedures, including the filtration of air

Figure 211 Drawing of mycelial network
showing hyphae with clamp connections and
scierotia-like bodies characteristic of species
in the Order Mycelia Sterilia.

through high efficiency particulate air (HEPA)
filters, recommended.

Macroscopic Appearance: Typically ap-

pearing as a fast growing whitish mycelium,
fine and or cottony in its growth. Species of
Mycelia Sterilia closely resemble mushroom mycelium and may be mistaken for it. Sometimes they
form whitish to blackish aggregates of hyphae that are scierotia-like.
Microscopic Characteristics: Having a well developed hyphal network, with or without clamp
connections. Only a vegetative mycelial stage is known. Since sporulating structures are absent,

fungi in this group reproduce through random fragmentation of hyphae.
History, Use and/or Medical Implications: The genus Scierotium noted for two species that
parasitize a variety of green plants. Otherwise, the Order is unremarkable.

Comments: Mycelia Sterilia is often called a "garbage order" for non-sporulating mycelium of
molds that can not be otherwise identified. Either a fungus has lost the ability to produce spores and
can exist only in a vegetative state, or it will only produce spores on media of narrow nutritional
specifications. In both cases, it is extremely difficult, if not impossible, to identify a fungus that has no
visible conidial (sporulating) stage.
There is a white mold that occasionally contaminates agar media and, by default, qualifies for

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