The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home

Paul Stamets. The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home. - Agarikon press, 1983

Содержание

FOREWORD by Dr. Andrew Weil

PREFACE

I. INTRODUCTION TO MUSHROOM CULTURE

II. STERILE TECHNIQUE AND AGAR CULTURE

III. GRAIN CULTURE

IV. THE MUSHROOM GROWING ROOM

V. COMPOST PREPARATION

VI. NON-COMPOSTED SUBSTRATES

VII. SPAWNING AND SPAWN RUNNING IN BULK SUBSTRATES

VIII. THE CASING LAYER

IX. STRATEGIES FOR MUSHROOM FORMATION (PINHEAD INITIATION)

X. ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS: SUSTAINING THE MUSHROOM CROP

XL GROWING PARAMETERS FOR VARIOUS MUSHROOM SPECIES

XII. CULTIVATION PROBLEMS AND THEIR SOLUTIONS: A TROUBLESHOOTING GUIDE

XIII. THE CONTAMINANTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE: IDENTIFICATION AND CONTROL

XIV. THE PESTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE

XV. MUSHROOM GENETICS

APPENDICES

GLOSSARY

BIBLIOGRAPHY

INDEX

PHOTOGRAPHY AND ILLUSTRATION CREDITS

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

OCR
290/The Mushroom Cultivator

MUCOR
Class: Zygomycetes

Order: Mucorales
Family: Mucoraceae

Common Names: the Black Pin Mold; the
Black Bread Mold

Habitat & Frequency of Occurrence: A
common saprophyte of stored grains; horse
dung; old straw; mushroom composts; peat;
soil; and plant debris. Mucor also rots textiles.

Medium Through Which Contamination Is Spread: Primarily air; secondarily
grain and contaminated compost.

Figure 209 Drawing of sporulating structure (sporangiophore) of Mucor.

Measures of Control: Air filtration;

suffi-

cient sterilization of grain; and immediate removal and isolation of contaminated regions,
'spent' compost, aged mushrooms or cropping debris. Exercizing general hygienic practices usual-

ly prevents this contaminant from becoming a problem.
Macroscopic Appearance: A fast growing fungus forming an interwoven dense mycelial mat,
whitish at first, producing a stalk-like sporangiophore which is not swollen at the apex but is enveloped by spherical spore producing body. Soon becoming grayish and then blackish overall with
pins". On malt
spore production. When Mucorsporulates, it appears like a "forest of black headed
agar, sporangiophores often do not form, making identification difficult.
Microscopic Charaderistics: Tall sporangiophores arising singly from the mycelial mat, adorned
with a spherical sporangium composed of many spores. Hyphae are non-septafe (lacking distinct
cell walls).

History, Use and/or Medical Implications: Some species toxic. Mucorpusi/lus and other mucuraceous fungi are the cause of a rare but deadly disease known as mucormycosis or phycomsicosis. Although Mucor attacks open wounds, the outer ear and the lungs, it is not a primary parasite
but one that takes advantage of poor health caused from other diseases. This disease and ones
related to it are more prevalent in tropical and semitropical zones than in temperate regions. For

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