The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home

Paul Stamets. The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home. - Agarikon press, 1983

Содержание

FOREWORD by Dr. Andrew Weil

PREFACE

I. INTRODUCTION TO MUSHROOM CULTURE

II. STERILE TECHNIQUE AND AGAR CULTURE

III. GRAIN CULTURE

IV. THE MUSHROOM GROWING ROOM

V. COMPOST PREPARATION

VI. NON-COMPOSTED SUBSTRATES

VII. SPAWNING AND SPAWN RUNNING IN BULK SUBSTRATES

VIII. THE CASING LAYER

IX. STRATEGIES FOR MUSHROOM FORMATION (PINHEAD INITIATION)

X. ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS: SUSTAINING THE MUSHROOM CROP

XL GROWING PARAMETERS FOR VARIOUS MUSHROOM SPECIES

XII. CULTIVATION PROBLEMS AND THEIR SOLUTIONS: A TROUBLESHOOTING GUIDE

XIII. THE CONTAMINANTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE: IDENTIFICATION AND CONTROL

XIV. THE PESTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE

XV. MUSHROOM GENETICS

APPENDICES

GLOSSARY

BIBLIOGRAPHY

INDEX

PHOTOGRAPHY AND ILLUSTRATION CREDITS

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

OCR
The Contaminants of Mushroom Culture/281

FUSARIUM
Class: Fungi Imperlecti
Order: Moniliales
Family: Tubericulariaceae
Common Names: The Brightly Colored
Contaminant; Damping
Yellow Rain Mold.

Off Disease;

or

Greek Root: Having the same root as "fusiform", meaning to be swollen in the center
and narrowing towards the ends, in reference
to the distinctive shape of the conidia.

Habitat & Frequency of Occurrence:
Commonly encountered in spawn production and in agar culture. A natural inhabitant
of grains (rye, wheat, barley, rice), Fusaria
also are found in soils, on living and decaying

plants and on decomposing textiles and

Figure 203 Drawing of simple sporulating
structure typical of the genus Fusarium.

paper.

Medium Through Which Contamination Is Spread: Air; grain; and casing soil.
Measures of Control: Sufficient sterilization of grain; isolation and proper disposal of contaminated cultures. General hygienic practices and air filtration prevent this contaminant. Increasing ven-

tilation while simultaneously decreasing humidify hinders the proliferation of this potentially
dangerous contaminant.

Macroscopic Appearance: Appearing as an extensive, fast growing, and whitish cottony mycelium which can remain whitish or, as in most cases, becomes brightly pigmented. Fusarium species
most frequently seen on grain are shades of pink, purple or yellow.
Microscopic Characteristics: Conidia generally sickle shaped; mulficelled; septate (segmented);
and developing from short, simple and irregularly branched conidiophores that arise from a cottony
mycelial mat. Conidia are canoe, crescent or sickle shaped, with the basal end notched or niched.
Some pear shaped, single celled microconidia are also produced.

History, Use and/or Medical Implications: Some Fusarium species highly toxic. Throughout

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