The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home

Paul Stamets. The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home. - Agarikon press, 1983

Содержание

FOREWORD by Dr. Andrew Weil

PREFACE

I. INTRODUCTION TO MUSHROOM CULTURE

II. STERILE TECHNIQUE AND AGAR CULTURE

III. GRAIN CULTURE

IV. THE MUSHROOM GROWING ROOM

V. COMPOST PREPARATION

VI. NON-COMPOSTED SUBSTRATES

VII. SPAWNING AND SPAWN RUNNING IN BULK SUBSTRATES

VIII. THE CASING LAYER

IX. STRATEGIES FOR MUSHROOM FORMATION (PINHEAD INITIATION)

X. ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS: SUSTAINING THE MUSHROOM CROP

XL GROWING PARAMETERS FOR VARIOUS MUSHROOM SPECIES

XII. CULTIVATION PROBLEMS AND THEIR SOLUTIONS: A TROUBLESHOOTING GUIDE

XIII. THE CONTAMINANTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE: IDENTIFICATION AND CONTROL

XIV. THE PESTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE

XV. MUSHROOM GENETICS

APPENDICES

GLOSSARY

BIBLIOGRAPHY

INDEX

PHOTOGRAPHY AND ILLUSTRATION CREDITS

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

OCR
272/The Mushroom Cultivator
process. Although not considered a dangerous competitor, species in this genus are common in the
piles of beginning compost makers. If this species occurs during spawn run or at cropping, it is an
indication of residual ammonia in the compost. Composfs that have excessive ammonia concentrations, composts that have been over-watered or fhose that are not homogenous in their structure encourage Coprinus infestation.

The species known to contaminate manure/straw composts are: Coprinus limetarius;
Coprinus atrementarius; and Coprinus niveus. According to Kurtzman (1978), Coprinus
limefarius has potential value as a commercially cultivated mushroom. All the above mentioned
species are ones seen in poorly prepared composts. Bitner (1972) noted that Coprinus is a contaminant of grain spawn, although rarely seen and present in only one of every hundred or so contaminated spawn jars.

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