The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home

Paul Stamets. The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home. - Agarikon press, 1983

Содержание

FOREWORD by Dr. Andrew Weil

PREFACE

I. INTRODUCTION TO MUSHROOM CULTURE

II. STERILE TECHNIQUE AND AGAR CULTURE

III. GRAIN CULTURE

IV. THE MUSHROOM GROWING ROOM

V. COMPOST PREPARATION

VI. NON-COMPOSTED SUBSTRATES

VII. SPAWNING AND SPAWN RUNNING IN BULK SUBSTRATES

VIII. THE CASING LAYER

IX. STRATEGIES FOR MUSHROOM FORMATION (PINHEAD INITIATION)

X. ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS: SUSTAINING THE MUSHROOM CROP

XL GROWING PARAMETERS FOR VARIOUS MUSHROOM SPECIES

XII. CULTIVATION PROBLEMS AND THEIR SOLUTIONS: A TROUBLESHOOTING GUIDE

XIII. THE CONTAMINANTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE: IDENTIFICATION AND CONTROL

XIV. THE PESTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE

XV. MUSHROOM GENETICS

APPENDICES

GLOSSARY

BIBLIOGRAPHY

INDEX

PHOTOGRAPHY AND ILLUSTRATION CREDITS

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

OCR
The Contaminants of Mushroom Culture/269
cylindrical, or are simply irregular in form and have peg-like markings ("scars") where adjacent
spores have been attached.

History, Use and/or Medical Implications: Some species toxic. Cladosporium carrionhi
causes a severe skin infection that is usually associated with workers who suffer punctures from
thorns or splinters.

Comments:

In one study (Kramer, 1959) where agar plates were exposed daily to the outside air
over a period of two years, Cladosporium spores were found to be the most numerically common
of all airborne fungi, representing 45% of the totals tallied. Of these species, C. cladosporioides
was the most frequently encountered. In contrast, Pen/c/Ilium is the most common fungus indoors,
undoubtedly due to the food habits of humans.

The dark conidiophore and the two celled conidia (spores) are the most distinquishing features
of this genus. Over 1 60 species have been described. The perfect stage of a variety of C. herbarum
Link ex Fr. is Mycosphaerella tulasnel Janz. C. herbarum has been isolated from timber, logs and

wood pulp. Cladosporium resinae lives on creosote and other petroleum products, including the
petroleum jelly used to "grease" the seals of pressure cookers. C. fulvum Cke. attacks tomato
leaves, appearing as brown to violet colonies. Other molds similar in appearance are Pen/c//I/urn
and Aspergillus.
For more in format/on see "Contribution to the Know/edge of the Genus Cladosporium L/nk.

ex Fr." by De Fries, 1952.
See Co/or Photograph 20.

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