The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home

Paul Stamets. The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home. - Agarikon press, 1983

Содержание

FOREWORD by Dr. Andrew Weil

PREFACE

I. INTRODUCTION TO MUSHROOM CULTURE

II. STERILE TECHNIQUE AND AGAR CULTURE

III. GRAIN CULTURE

IV. THE MUSHROOM GROWING ROOM

V. COMPOST PREPARATION

VI. NON-COMPOSTED SUBSTRATES

VII. SPAWNING AND SPAWN RUNNING IN BULK SUBSTRATES

VIII. THE CASING LAYER

IX. STRATEGIES FOR MUSHROOM FORMATION (PINHEAD INITIATION)

X. ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS: SUSTAINING THE MUSHROOM CROP

XL GROWING PARAMETERS FOR VARIOUS MUSHROOM SPECIES

XII. CULTIVATION PROBLEMS AND THEIR SOLUTIONS: A TROUBLESHOOTING GUIDE

XIII. THE CONTAMINANTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE: IDENTIFICATION AND CONTROL

XIV. THE PESTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE

XV. MUSHROOM GENETICS

APPENDICES

GLOSSARY

BIBLIOGRAPHY

INDEX

PHOTOGRAPHY AND ILLUSTRATION CREDITS

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

OCR
268/The Mushroom Cultivator

CLADOSPORIUM
Class: Fungi Imperlecti
Order: Moniliales
Family: Dematicaeae
Common Name: The Dark Green Mold.
Greek Roof: From "klados" which means

branched and "sporium" or spore. The
name is in reference to fhe two celled spores
produced on branches from the main body of
the conidiophore.

Habitat & Frequency of Occurrence:
Cladosporium is the most predominant
genus of all the airborne contaminants, Its

Figure 195 Drawing of Cladosporium. Note
the two celled conidia.

species can be both saprophytic and parasitic.

At least three species infect grain spawn
although they are not as common as the

Aspergilli and Penicillia. Most species grow
poorly on malt agar media. Many decompose paper products (several of the black molds on old
books are Cladosporia), plant debris, vegetables and other higher plants.

Medium Through Which Contamination Is Spread: Air.
Measures of Control: Good hygienic practices; removal of supportive substrates; and filtration of
air through micron filters.
Macroscopic Appearance: Species of Cladosporium causing problems in spawn production are
typically dark green in color, often becoming blackish with age, and resemble the powdery
Penici/lium type molds.

Microscopic Characteristics: Conidia (spores) and conidiophores distinctly septate; darkly pigmented; conidiophores vertically oriented and variously diverging; tall; forked into several terminal
shoots at the apex from which the conidia arise in a chain-like fashion with the basal conidium being
the oldest and the apical one being the youngest. Conidia are one or two celled, developing from
the swollen ends of the conidiophores, and variously shaped (measuring from as small as 3-6 x
2-3.5 microns to as large as 1 5-20 x 6-8 microns). Some conidia are ovoid, lemon shaped and

PDF compression, OCR, web-optimization with CVISION's PdfCompressor