The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home

Paul Stamets. The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home. - Agarikon press, 1983

Содержание

FOREWORD by Dr. Andrew Weil

PREFACE

I. INTRODUCTION TO MUSHROOM CULTURE

II. STERILE TECHNIQUE AND AGAR CULTURE

III. GRAIN CULTURE

IV. THE MUSHROOM GROWING ROOM

V. COMPOST PREPARATION

VI. NON-COMPOSTED SUBSTRATES

VII. SPAWNING AND SPAWN RUNNING IN BULK SUBSTRATES

VIII. THE CASING LAYER

IX. STRATEGIES FOR MUSHROOM FORMATION (PINHEAD INITIATION)

X. ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS: SUSTAINING THE MUSHROOM CROP

XL GROWING PARAMETERS FOR VARIOUS MUSHROOM SPECIES

XII. CULTIVATION PROBLEMS AND THEIR SOLUTIONS: A TROUBLESHOOTING GUIDE

XIII. THE CONTAMINANTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE: IDENTIFICATION AND CONTROL

XIV. THE PESTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE

XV. MUSHROOM GENETICS

APPENDICES

GLOSSARY

BIBLIOGRAPHY

INDEX

PHOTOGRAPHY AND ILLUSTRATION CREDITS

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

OCR
The Contaminants of Mushroom Culture/267
Comments: Chrysosporium is an indicator mold whose presence can be traced to compost prepared on soil. Yellow mat disease is caused by Chrysosporium luteum, a synonym of
Myceliopthora lutea. Another species, Chrysosporium suiphureum, is known as Confetti, and is at
first whitish, then yellowish towards the center. These molds were fairly common in Agaricus
culture previous to 1 940, when composts were prepared directly on soil. With the advent of concrete composting wharfs, they have all but disappeared. According to Atkins (1974), this contaminant is more frequent in cave culture because of the use of ridge beds made directly on the floor of
the cave. Chiysosporium is usually not detected until the first break and retards subsequent flushes.
Moderate to severe outbreaks of either species can adversely affect yields.
Both raw and prepared composts can become infected with this mold. It is thought that the
spores are introduced with the fresh air during the cool down period of the Phase II or from thermotolerant spores from within the compost itself. Species in this genus can be found on media of poor
nutritional quality. They are generally not seen in spawn culture.
Ch,ysosporium can be grown for study on a hay infusion agar supplemented with sugar. Many
Chrysosporia have sexual forms in the Gymnoascaceae, an ascomycetous family.

For futher information see:
Carmichael, J.W., 1 962 "Chtysosporium and some other Aleuriosporic Hyphomycetes.".
van Oorshot, C.A.N., 1980 "A Revision of Chrysosporium and Allied Genera". Studies in
Mycology No. 20. CBS Publication, Baarn, Nederland.

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