The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home

Paul Stamets. The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home. - Agarikon press, 1983

Содержание

FOREWORD by Dr. Andrew Weil

PREFACE

I. INTRODUCTION TO MUSHROOM CULTURE

II. STERILE TECHNIQUE AND AGAR CULTURE

III. GRAIN CULTURE

IV. THE MUSHROOM GROWING ROOM

V. COMPOST PREPARATION

VI. NON-COMPOSTED SUBSTRATES

VII. SPAWNING AND SPAWN RUNNING IN BULK SUBSTRATES

VIII. THE CASING LAYER

IX. STRATEGIES FOR MUSHROOM FORMATION (PINHEAD INITIATION)

X. ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS: SUSTAINING THE MUSHROOM CROP

XL GROWING PARAMETERS FOR VARIOUS MUSHROOM SPECIES

XII. CULTIVATION PROBLEMS AND THEIR SOLUTIONS: A TROUBLESHOOTING GUIDE

XIII. THE CONTAMINANTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE: IDENTIFICATION AND CONTROL

XIV. THE PESTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE

XV. MUSHROOM GENETICS

APPENDICES

GLOSSARY

BIBLIOGRAPHY

INDEX

PHOTOGRAPHY AND ILLUSTRATION CREDITS

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

OCR
266/The Mushroom

CHRYSOSPORIUM
Class: Fungi Impen'ecti
Order: Moniliales
Family: Aleuriosporae

Common Names: The Yellow Mat Disease; Yellow Mold; Confetti Disease.

Latin Root: From "chryso-" meaning
golden and "sporium" or spore.
Habitat & Frequency of Occurence: Saprophyfic, a common mold in soils, and endemic to composts prepared in direct contact

with the ground. Although Chiysosporium
species naturally inhabit the dung of mosf
pastured animals and of chickens, today they

Figure 194 Drawing of the sporulating
structure typical of Chrysosporium luteum,
the cause of Yellow Mat Disease.

are rarely seen in finished mushroom cornposts with the development of modern composting methods.

Medium Through Which Contamination Is Spread: Air; soil; and dung.

Measures of Control: Concrete surface used for composfing; isolation of mushroom compost
from areas where untreated soils and raw dung are being stored; and filtration of air during Phase IT.
If Chnjsosporium occurs before or at the time of casing, salt or a similar alkaline buffer can be ap-

plied to limit the spread of infection.
Macroscopic Appearance: Whitish at first, soon yellowish towards the center and maybe yellowish overall in color, forming a "corky" layer of tissue between the infected compost and the casing
soil, and inhibiting fruitbody formation.
Microscopic Characteristics: Conidiophores poorly developed, relatively undifferentiated, irregularly branched, vertically oriented, for the most part resembling and associated with the vegetative
mycelium. Clear, unicellular and often ornamented spores (conidia) develop terminally, either in
short chains or singularly, and measure 3-5 x 4-7 microns.

History, Use and/or Medical Implications: The genus in general does not host many pathogenic species. One species of special concern is Chiysosporium dermatidis and allies, a mold causing a skin disease in humans.

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