The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home

Paul Stamets. The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home. - Agarikon press, 1983

Содержание

FOREWORD by Dr. Andrew Weil

PREFACE

I. INTRODUCTION TO MUSHROOM CULTURE

II. STERILE TECHNIQUE AND AGAR CULTURE

III. GRAIN CULTURE

IV. THE MUSHROOM GROWING ROOM

V. COMPOST PREPARATION

VI. NON-COMPOSTED SUBSTRATES

VII. SPAWNING AND SPAWN RUNNING IN BULK SUBSTRATES

VIII. THE CASING LAYER

IX. STRATEGIES FOR MUSHROOM FORMATION (PINHEAD INITIATION)

X. ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS: SUSTAINING THE MUSHROOM CROP

XL GROWING PARAMETERS FOR VARIOUS MUSHROOM SPECIES

XII. CULTIVATION PROBLEMS AND THEIR SOLUTIONS: A TROUBLESHOOTING GUIDE

XIII. THE CONTAMINANTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE: IDENTIFICATION AND CONTROL

XIV. THE PESTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE

XV. MUSHROOM GENETICS

APPENDICES

GLOSSARY

BIBLIOGRAPHY

INDEX

PHOTOGRAPHY AND ILLUSTRATION CREDITS

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

OCR
264/The Mushroom Cultivator

CHAETOMIUM
Class: Ascomycetes

Order: Sphaeria/es
Family: Chaetomiaceae

Common Name: The Olive Green Mold.
Greek Root: Having the same root as the
suffix "-chaeta" which means long hair.

Habitat & Frequency of Occurrence:
Common on fresh manure; especially on
compost that has been anaerobically pasteurized;

Figure 193 Drawing of Chaefomium
perithecium, asci and spores.

refuse materials; straw; "leaf mold";

soils; plant debris; paper products; and cloth
fabric. Chaetomium is a rare contaminant of
grain and is infrequently seen in agar culture.
A white species occurs on the casing layer.

Medium Through Which Contamination Is Spread: Air; soil; compost; and grain.
Measures of Control: General hygienic practices; aerobic pasteurization and Phase II. See Comments.

Macroscopic Appearance: Mycelia inconspicuous at first, grayish and in some species whitish,
cottony, dense and aerial (as in "White Chaetomium"). Some forms become light brown, yellowish
or with orangish hues when well developed. At maturity these molds can become dark green to
olive green colored, and form scattered "burrs" which in fact are perithecia containing spores.

Microscopic Characteristics: Mycelium forming a thin walled envelope (a perithecium) from
which unbranched hairs extend. A slit in the perithecium exposes sacs (asci) containing spores
which are then liberated into the air. Spores are unicellular, darkly pigmented and can be ovoid,
lemon-shaped or ellipsoid.

History, Use and/or Medical Implications: Secreting a compound called "chaetomin" that is
toxic to Gram-positive bacteria and to mushrooms and other fungi.
Comments: Chaefomjum inhibits mycelial growth through the toxins it produces as well as by

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