The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home

Paul Stamets. The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home. - Agarikon press, 1983

Содержание

FOREWORD by Dr. Andrew Weil

PREFACE

I. INTRODUCTION TO MUSHROOM CULTURE

II. STERILE TECHNIQUE AND AGAR CULTURE

III. GRAIN CULTURE

IV. THE MUSHROOM GROWING ROOM

V. COMPOST PREPARATION

VI. NON-COMPOSTED SUBSTRATES

VII. SPAWNING AND SPAWN RUNNING IN BULK SUBSTRATES

VIII. THE CASING LAYER

IX. STRATEGIES FOR MUSHROOM FORMATION (PINHEAD INITIATION)

X. ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS: SUSTAINING THE MUSHROOM CROP

XL GROWING PARAMETERS FOR VARIOUS MUSHROOM SPECIES

XII. CULTIVATION PROBLEMS AND THEIR SOLUTIONS: A TROUBLESHOOTING GUIDE

XIII. THE CONTAMINANTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE: IDENTIFICATION AND CONTROL

XIV. THE PESTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE

XV. MUSHROOM GENETICS

APPENDICES

GLOSSARY

BIBLIOGRAPHY

INDEX

PHOTOGRAPHY AND ILLUSTRATION CREDITS

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

OCR
254/The Mushroom Cultivator
this genus are generally Gram negative.

History, Use and/or Medical Implications: Some species pathogenic to humans. Of special
note is Pseudomonas aeruginosa (also known as Ps. pyocyanea), a species that causes blindness
and other diseases. Pseudomonas putida is stimulatory to primordia formation in certain strains of
Agaricus brunnescens (bisporus) and its use is of potential commercial value.

Comments: More than 140 species have been identified thus far; only a few have been identified
as affecting mushrooms. Pseudomonas species are much more sensitive to heat sterilization than
the endospore-forming bacilli. Pseudomonas bacteria proliferate in standing water or anywhere
there is moisture.
Pseudomonas tolaasii is the cause of bacterial blotch that can devastate crops of Agaricus and

Psilocybe. One biological remedy for controlling this species was proposed by Nair and Fahy
(1972) who showed that introduction of Pseudomonas fluorescens, a natural antagonist to
Pseudomonas tolaasii, markedly decreased the occurrence of blotch while not hindering Agaricus
brunnescens yields. Others believe Pseudomonas fluorescens to be merely a variety of
Pseudomonas tolaasii, and hesitate to recommend it.
In a characteristic manner, Pseudomonas tolaasii causes sunken grayish brown lesions on the
mushroom cap in which a slimy fluid collects. Another Pseudomonas species, yet unidentified, has
been implicated in the cause of a more severe form of blotch, Bacterial Pit.

Pseudomonas also contaminates agar and grain cultures, inhibiting mycelial growth. The use
of antibiotics (gentamycin sulfate) or micron filters prevents outbreaks of this contaminant. A few
species cause the mycelium to grow more rapidly and luxuriantly. Similarly, considerable attention
has centered on the beneficial role of Pseudomonas put ida and allies in the casing layer. This subject is discussed in detail in Appendix II.
See also Bacillus.

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