The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home

Paul Stamets. The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home. - Agarikon press, 1983

Содержание

FOREWORD by Dr. Andrew Weil

PREFACE

I. INTRODUCTION TO MUSHROOM CULTURE

II. STERILE TECHNIQUE AND AGAR CULTURE

III. GRAIN CULTURE

IV. THE MUSHROOM GROWING ROOM

V. COMPOST PREPARATION

VI. NON-COMPOSTED SUBSTRATES

VII. SPAWNING AND SPAWN RUNNING IN BULK SUBSTRATES

VIII. THE CASING LAYER

IX. STRATEGIES FOR MUSHROOM FORMATION (PINHEAD INITIATION)

X. ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS: SUSTAINING THE MUSHROOM CROP

XL GROWING PARAMETERS FOR VARIOUS MUSHROOM SPECIES

XII. CULTIVATION PROBLEMS AND THEIR SOLUTIONS: A TROUBLESHOOTING GUIDE

XIII. THE CONTAMINANTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE: IDENTIFICATION AND CONTROL

XIV. THE PESTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE

XV. MUSHROOM GENETICS

APPENDICES

GLOSSARY

BIBLIOGRAPHY

INDEX

PHOTOGRAPHY AND ILLUSTRATION CREDITS

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

OCR
Introduction to Mushroom Culture! 9

Figure 7 Scanning electron micrograph of hyphae emanating from a bed of germinating Psilocybe cubensis spores.
When a mycelium produces mushrooms, several radical changes in its metabolism occurs. Up
to this point, the mycelium has been growing vegetatively. In the vegetative state, hyphal cells are
amassing nutrients. Curiously, fhere is a gradual increase in the number of nuclei per cell, sometimes to as many as ten just prior to the formation of mushrooms. Immediately before fruitbodies
form, new cell walls divide the nuclei, reducing their number per cell to an average of two. The high
number of nuclei per cell in pre-generative mycelia seems to be a prerequisite for fruiting in many
mushroom species.
As the gills mature, basidia cells emerge in ever increasing numbers, first appearing as small
bubble-like cells and resembling cobblestones on a street. The basidia are the focal point in the reproductive phase of the mushroom life cycle. The basidia, however, do not mature all at once. In
the genus Panaeolus for instance, the basidia cells mature regionally, giving the gill surface a
spotted look. The cells giving rise to the basidia are typically binucleate, each nucleus is haploid
(1 N) and the cell is said to be dikaryotic. The composition of the young basidia cells are similar. At a
specific point in time, the two nuclei in the basidium migrate towards one another and merge into a
single diploid (2N) nucleus. This event is known as karyogamy. Soon thereafter, the diploid nucleus undergoes meiosis and typically produces four haploid daughter cells.

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