The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home

Paul Stamets. The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home. - Agarikon press, 1983

Содержание

FOREWORD by Dr. Andrew Weil

PREFACE

I. INTRODUCTION TO MUSHROOM CULTURE

II. STERILE TECHNIQUE AND AGAR CULTURE

III. GRAIN CULTURE

IV. THE MUSHROOM GROWING ROOM

V. COMPOST PREPARATION

VI. NON-COMPOSTED SUBSTRATES

VII. SPAWNING AND SPAWN RUNNING IN BULK SUBSTRATES

VIII. THE CASING LAYER

IX. STRATEGIES FOR MUSHROOM FORMATION (PINHEAD INITIATION)

X. ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS: SUSTAINING THE MUSHROOM CROP

XL GROWING PARAMETERS FOR VARIOUS MUSHROOM SPECIES

XII. CULTIVATION PROBLEMS AND THEIR SOLUTIONS: A TROUBLESHOOTING GUIDE

XIII. THE CONTAMINANTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE: IDENTIFICATION AND CONTROL

XIV. THE PESTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE

XV. MUSHROOM GENETICS

APPENDICES

GLOSSARY

BIBLIOGRAPHY

INDEX

PHOTOGRAPHY AND ILLUSTRATION CREDITS

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

OCR
8/The Mushroom Cultivator

Figure 6

Scanning electron micrograph of a Psilocybe baeocystis spore germinating.

vigorous than unmated, monokaryotic mycelia. Once a mycelium has entered into the dikaryophase, fruiting can occur shortly thereafter. In Psi/ocybe cubensis, the time between spore germination and fruitbody initials can be as brief as two weeks; in some Panaeolus species only a week
transpires before mushrooms appear. Most mushroom species, however, take several weeks or
months before mushrooms can be generated from the time of spore germination.
Cultivators interested in developing new strains by crossing single spore isolates take advantage

of the occurrence of clamp connections to tell whether or not mating has taken place. Clamp
connections are microscopic bridges that protrude from one adjoining cell to another and are only
found in dikaryotic mycelia. Clamps can be readily seen with a light microscope at 1 00400X
magnification. Not all species form clamp connections. (Agaricus brunnescens does not; most all
Psilocybe and Panaeolus species do). In contrast, mycelia resulting from haploid spores lack
clamps. This feature is an invaluable tool for the researcher developing new strains. (For more information on breeding strategies, see Chapter XV.)

Two dikaryotic mycelial networks can also grow together, exchange genetic material and form
a new strain. Such an encounter, where two hyphal systems fuse, is known as anastomosis. When
two incompatible colonies of mycelia meet, a zone of inhibited growth frequently forms. On agar
media, this zone of incompatibility is visible to the unaided eye.

PDF compression, OCR, web-optimization with CVISION's PdfCompressor