The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home

Paul Stamets. The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home. - Agarikon press, 1983

Содержание

FOREWORD by Dr. Andrew Weil

PREFACE

I. INTRODUCTION TO MUSHROOM CULTURE

II. STERILE TECHNIQUE AND AGAR CULTURE

III. GRAIN CULTURE

IV. THE MUSHROOM GROWING ROOM

V. COMPOST PREPARATION

VI. NON-COMPOSTED SUBSTRATES

VII. SPAWNING AND SPAWN RUNNING IN BULK SUBSTRATES

VIII. THE CASING LAYER

IX. STRATEGIES FOR MUSHROOM FORMATION (PINHEAD INITIATION)

X. ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS: SUSTAINING THE MUSHROOM CROP

XL GROWING PARAMETERS FOR VARIOUS MUSHROOM SPECIES

XII. CULTIVATION PROBLEMS AND THEIR SOLUTIONS: A TROUBLESHOOTING GUIDE

XIII. THE CONTAMINANTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE: IDENTIFICATION AND CONTROL

XIV. THE PESTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE

XV. MUSHROOM GENETICS

APPENDICES

GLOSSARY

BIBLIOGRAPHY

INDEX

PHOTOGRAPHY AND ILLUSTRATION CREDITS

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

OCR
Introduction to Mushroom Culture/7
vide a sufficiently moist environment, the spores rehydrate and fully inflate. Only then is germination
possible.

Spores within an individual species are fairly constant in their shape and structure. However,
many. mushroom species differ remarkably in their spore types. Some are smooth and lemon
shaped (in the genus Copelandia, for instance); many are ellipsoid (as in the genus Psilocybe);
while others are highly ornamented and irregularly shaped (such as those in Lactarius or Entoloma).
A feature common to the spores of many mushrooms, particularly the psilocybian species, is the

formation of an apical germ pore.
The germ pore, a circular depression at one end of the spore, is the site of germination from
which a haploid strand of mycelium called a hypha emanates. This hypha continues to grow,
branches and becomes a mycelial network. When two sexually complementary hyphal networks
intercept one another and make contact, cell walls separating the two hyphal systems dissolve and
cytoplasmic and genetic materials are exchanged. Erotic or not, this is "mushroom sex". Henceforth, all resulting mycelium is binucleate and dikaryotic. This means each cell has two nuclei
and a full complement of chromosomes. With few exceptions, only mated (dikaryofic) mycelia is
fertile and capable of producing fruitbodies. Typically, dikaryotic mycelia is faster running and more

Figure 5

High resolution scanning electron micrograph showing germ pores of

Psilocybe pelliculosa spores.

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