The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home

Paul Stamets. The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home. - Agarikon press, 1983

Содержание

FOREWORD by Dr. Andrew Weil

PREFACE

I. INTRODUCTION TO MUSHROOM CULTURE

II. STERILE TECHNIQUE AND AGAR CULTURE

III. GRAIN CULTURE

IV. THE MUSHROOM GROWING ROOM

V. COMPOST PREPARATION

VI. NON-COMPOSTED SUBSTRATES

VII. SPAWNING AND SPAWN RUNNING IN BULK SUBSTRATES

VIII. THE CASING LAYER

IX. STRATEGIES FOR MUSHROOM FORMATION (PINHEAD INITIATION)

X. ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS: SUSTAINING THE MUSHROOM CROP

XL GROWING PARAMETERS FOR VARIOUS MUSHROOM SPECIES

XII. CULTIVATION PROBLEMS AND THEIR SOLUTIONS: A TROUBLESHOOTING GUIDE

XIII. THE CONTAMINANTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE: IDENTIFICATION AND CONTROL

XIV. THE PESTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE

XV. MUSHROOM GENETICS

APPENDICES

GLOSSARY

BIBLIOGRAPHY

INDEX

PHOTOGRAPHY AND ILLUSTRATION CREDITS

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

OCR
182/The Mushroom Cultivator
Harvest Stage: While the mushroom caps remain convex.
Flushing Interval: 10-1 4 days.
Light: Same as above.
Yield Potential: Data very limited. Yields of one and a quarter pounds per square foot in 1 4 weeks
have been reported by Visscher (1981). (Recent studies show that yields can be increased substantially, although no maxima have yet been established.)

Moisture Content of Mushrooms: 88-90% water; 10-12% dry matter.
Nutritional Content: No data available.
Comments: Several contraditions about the fruiting requirements for this species are apparent. Although Wright and Hayes (1 979) reported that immature horse manure/straw composts
supported the most vigorous mycelial growth, the work of previous researchers indicates that the
best fruitings occurred on "spent" compost that has been colonized for a year or more. Fruitbodies
also form on spawned leaf mulch mixed with sawdust. The fruiting mechanism may, in part, be controlled by bacterial flora associated with leaf mulch and the decomposition process.
Singer (1 963) reported that mycelium implanted in beds of horse manure/straw compost for
7-1 4 months produced mushrooms directly after the appearance of rhizomorphs. J. Garbaye et al.
(1 979) published data indicating that the supplementation of natural patches with a NPKCa mineral
fertilization induced large fruitings of L. nuda as well as Boletus edulis and Lepiota rachodes, Iwo
unrelated species of culinary distinction.
Alexander Smith (1 980) remarks that this mushroom should not be eaten raw, but only after
cooking. European books have reported that this mushroom contains thermobile hemolysin, a
compound that degenerates red blood cells. Although this mushroom has been responsible for scattered poisonings when quantities have been eaten, the effects have been relatively minor and the
toxin is easily destroyed by cooking or parboiling. Lepista nuda is, however, a mushroom with
many positive attributes. Its striking color, firm texture and good taste recommend this species as

one of high culinary appeal.
Some commercial production of L. nuda is ongoing in Europe. Nevertheless, this mushroom
is not, as of yet, a species with yields substantial enough to warrant commercial production in this
country. It is a mushroom more suited to the interests of home cultivators and natural culture techniques.

Genetic Characteristics: Basidia tetrapolar, forming four haploid spores; heterothallic. Dikaryons
with clamp connections. See Chapter XV.

For more information consult:
S.H. Wright and W.A. Hayes, 1 979. "Nutrition and Fruit body Formation of Lepista Nuda
(Bull. ex Fr.) Cooke", pp. 873-884 in Mushroom Science X, Part I. Bordeaux.
J. Garbaye et alia, 1979. "Production De Champignons Comestibles En Foret Par Fertilisation Minerale-Premiers Resultats Sur Rhodopaxillus Nudus". pp.81 1-816 in Mushroom Science
X, Part I. Bordeaux.
M. Vaandrager and H.R. Visscher, 1981. Experiments on the Cultivation of Lepisfa Nuda, the

Wood Blewit", pp. 749759 in Mushroom Science XI, Australia.

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