The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home

Paul Stamets. The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home. - Agarikon press, 1983

Содержание

FOREWORD by Dr. Andrew Weil

PREFACE

I. INTRODUCTION TO MUSHROOM CULTURE

II. STERILE TECHNIQUE AND AGAR CULTURE

III. GRAIN CULTURE

IV. THE MUSHROOM GROWING ROOM

V. COMPOST PREPARATION

VI. NON-COMPOSTED SUBSTRATES

VII. SPAWNING AND SPAWN RUNNING IN BULK SUBSTRATES

VIII. THE CASING LAYER

IX. STRATEGIES FOR MUSHROOM FORMATION (PINHEAD INITIATION)

X. ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS: SUSTAINING THE MUSHROOM CROP

XL GROWING PARAMETERS FOR VARIOUS MUSHROOM SPECIES

XII. CULTIVATION PROBLEMS AND THEIR SOLUTIONS: A TROUBLESHOOTING GUIDE

XIII. THE CONTAMINANTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE: IDENTIFICATION AND CONTROL

XIV. THE PESTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE

XV. MUSHROOM GENETICS

APPENDICES

GLOSSARY

BIBLIOGRAPHY

INDEX

PHOTOGRAPHY AND ILLUSTRATION CREDITS

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

OCR
Introduction to Mushroom Culture/ 3

AN OVERVIEW OF TECHNIQUES
FOR MUSHROOM CULTIVATION

T

echniques for cultivating mushrooms, whatever the species, follow the same basic pattern.
Whereas two species may differ in temperature requirements, pH preferences or the substrate
on which they grow, the steps leading to fruiting are essentially the same. They can be summarized
as follows:
1.

Preparation and pouring of agar media into pefri dishes.

2. Germination of spores and isolation of pure mushroom mycelium.
3. Expansion of mycelial mass on agar media.

4. Preparation of grain media.
5. Inoculation of grain media with pure mycelium grown on agar media.
6. Incubation of inoculated grain media (spawn).

7. A. Laying out grain spawn onto trays.
or

B. Inoculation of grain spawn into bulk substrates.
8. Casing—covering of substrate with a moist mixture of peat and other materials.
9. Initiation—lowering temperature, increasing humidity to 95%, increasing air circulation,

decreasing carbon dioxide and/or introducing light.

10. Cropping—maintaining temperature, lowering humidity to 85-92%, maintaining air circulation, carbon dioxide and/or light levels.
With many species moderate crops can be produced on cased grain cultures. Or, the cultivator
can go one step further and inoculate compost, straw or wood. In either case, the fruiting of mushrooms requires a high humidity environment that can be readily controlled. Without proper moisture, mushrooms don't grow.
In the subsequent chapters standard methods for germinating spores are discussed, followed by

techniques for growing mycelium on agar, producing grain and/or bran "spawn", preparing cornposted and non-composted substrates, spawn running, casing and pinhead formation. With this last
step the methods for fruiting various species diverge and techniques specific to each mushroom are
individually outlined. A trouble-shooting guide helps cultivators identify and solve problems that are
commonly encountered. This is followed by a thorough analysis of the contaminants and pests of
mushroom culture and a chapter explaining the nature of mushroom genetics. In all, the book is a
system of knowledge that integrates the various techniques developed by commercial growers
worldwide and makes the cultivation of mushrooms at home a practical endeavor.

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