The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home

Paul Stamets. The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home. - Agarikon press, 1983

Содержание

FOREWORD by Dr. Andrew Weil

PREFACE

I. INTRODUCTION TO MUSHROOM CULTURE

II. STERILE TECHNIQUE AND AGAR CULTURE

III. GRAIN CULTURE

IV. THE MUSHROOM GROWING ROOM

V. COMPOST PREPARATION

VI. NON-COMPOSTED SUBSTRATES

VII. SPAWNING AND SPAWN RUNNING IN BULK SUBSTRATES

VIII. THE CASING LAYER

IX. STRATEGIES FOR MUSHROOM FORMATION (PINHEAD INITIATION)

X. ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS: SUSTAINING THE MUSHROOM CROP

XL GROWING PARAMETERS FOR VARIOUS MUSHROOM SPECIES

XII. CULTIVATION PROBLEMS AND THEIR SOLUTIONS: A TROUBLESHOOTING GUIDE

XIII. THE CONTAMINANTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE: IDENTIFICATION AND CONTROL

XIV. THE PESTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE

XV. MUSHROOM GENETICS

APPENDICES

GLOSSARY

BIBLIOGRAPHY

INDEX

PHOTOGRAPHY AND ILLUSTRATION CREDITS

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

OCR
128/The Mushroom Cultivator

C

overing the substrate surface with a layer of moist material having specific structural character-

istics is called casing. This practice was developed by Agaricus growers who found that

mushroom formation was stimulated by covering their compost with such a layer. A casing layer encourages fruiting and enhances yield potential in many, but not all, cultivated mushrooms.
CASING

OPTIONAL

SPECIES

CASING
REQUIRED

CASING

NOT REQUIRED

Ag. brunnescens
Ag. biforquis
C. comatus
Fl. velutipes
Lentinus edodes
Lepista n uda
P1. ostreatus
Pt. ostreatus
(Florida variety)
Pan. cyanescens
Pan. subbalteatus

I
C

Ps. cubensis
Ps. cyanescens
Ps. mexicana
Ps. tam pan ens/s

I

rugoso-annulata
V. volvacea

S.

In all species where the use of a casing has been indicated as optional, yields are clearly enhanced with the application of one. The chart above refers to the practical cultivation of mushrooms in quantity. It excludes fruitings on nutrified agar media or on othersubstrates that produce
but a few mushrooms. Consequently, casing has become an integral part of the mushroom growing methodology.

Functions
The basic functions of the casing layer are:

1. To protect the colonized substrate from drying out.
Mushroom mycelium is extremely sensitive to dry air. Although a fully colonized substrate is primarily protected from dehydration by its container (the tray, jar or plastic bag),
the cropping surface remains exposed. Should the exposed surface dry out, the mycelium dies and forms a hardened mat of cells. By covering the surface with a moist casing
layer, the mycelium is protected from the damaging effects of drying. Moisture toss from
the substrate is also reduced.

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