The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home

Paul Stamets. The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home. - Agarikon press, 1983

Содержание

FOREWORD by Dr. Andrew Weil

PREFACE

I. INTRODUCTION TO MUSHROOM CULTURE

II. STERILE TECHNIQUE AND AGAR CULTURE

III. GRAIN CULTURE

IV. THE MUSHROOM GROWING ROOM

V. COMPOST PREPARATION

VI. NON-COMPOSTED SUBSTRATES

VII. SPAWNING AND SPAWN RUNNING IN BULK SUBSTRATES

VIII. THE CASING LAYER

IX. STRATEGIES FOR MUSHROOM FORMATION (PINHEAD INITIATION)

X. ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS: SUSTAINING THE MUSHROOM CROP

XL GROWING PARAMETERS FOR VARIOUS MUSHROOM SPECIES

XII. CULTIVATION PROBLEMS AND THEIR SOLUTIONS: A TROUBLESHOOTING GUIDE

XIII. THE CONTAMINANTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE: IDENTIFICATION AND CONTROL

XIV. THE PESTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE

XV. MUSHROOM GENETICS

APPENDICES

GLOSSARY

BIBLIOGRAPHY

INDEX

PHOTOGRAPHY AND ILLUSTRATION CREDITS

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

OCR
126/The Mushroom Cultivator
method of counteracting drying is to cover the substrate with plastic. Be ready to remove the covering during the period of peak activity if temperatures rise too quickly.

During spawn run the mushroom mycelium generates large quantities of carbon dioxide. In
fact, it has been demonstrated that mushroom mycelium is capable of CO2 fixation. Because of this
ability to absorb C02, room concentrations of 10,000-15,000 ppm are considered beneficial and
desirable. A CO2 level high enough to stop growth is uncommon under normal circumstances. Being heavier than air, CO2 settles at the bottom of the room, which is yet another reason for even air
circulation within the growing environment.

Super Spawning
Super spawning is also called "active mycelium spawning" vis vis the Hunke-Till process.
Essentially, a set amount of substrate is inoculated and colonized in the normal manner. The fully
run substrate is then used as inoculum to spawn increased amounts of a similar substrate. One
could theoretically pyramid a small quantity of inoculum into a considerable amount of fully colonized substrate. This technique requires the primary substrate to be contaminant free; otherwise
contamination, not mycelium, will be propagated. The possibilities inherent in this method may be
of greater application when transferring naturally occurring mycelial colonies to non-sterile yet
mushroom specific substrates. An excellent example of this is the propagation of Psilocybe
cyanescens on wood chips. (See Chapter VI.)

Supplementation at Spawning
One of the newest advances in Agaricus culture is the development of delayed release nutrients
added to the compost at spawning. These supplements are specially formulated nutrients encapsulated in a denatured protein coat. They are designed to become available to the growing mushrooms during the first three flushes. The application rate is 5-7% of the dry weight of the substrate.
Yield increases of ½ to 1 lb/sq. ft. are normal. Here again, complete and thorough mixing is essential to success. Caution: these materials enrich the substrate, making it more suitable to contaminants if factors predisposing to their growth are present. (For suppliers of delayed release nutrients,
refer to the resource section in the Appendix).

Supplementation at Casing (S.A.C.)
SACing is another method used to boost the nutritional content of the substrate. The materials
used are soy bean meal, cottonseed meal, and/or ground rye, wheat or kafir corn grains. The fully
colonized substrate is thoroughly mixed with any one of these materials at a rate of 1 0% of the dry
weight of the substrate. The substrate and the supplements must both be clean and free from contaminants; otherwise contamination will spread and threaten the entire culture. High substrate temperatures should be anticipated on the second to third day after supplementation. With this type of
nutrient enhancement yield increases of ½-2 lbs/sq. ft. are possible.

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