The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home

Paul Stamets. The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home. - Agarikon press, 1983

Содержание

FOREWORD by Dr. Andrew Weil

PREFACE

I. INTRODUCTION TO MUSHROOM CULTURE

II. STERILE TECHNIQUE AND AGAR CULTURE

III. GRAIN CULTURE

IV. THE MUSHROOM GROWING ROOM

V. COMPOST PREPARATION

VI. NON-COMPOSTED SUBSTRATES

VII. SPAWNING AND SPAWN RUNNING IN BULK SUBSTRATES

VIII. THE CASING LAYER

IX. STRATEGIES FOR MUSHROOM FORMATION (PINHEAD INITIATION)

X. ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS: SUSTAINING THE MUSHROOM CROP

XL GROWING PARAMETERS FOR VARIOUS MUSHROOM SPECIES

XII. CULTIVATION PROBLEMS AND THEIR SOLUTIONS: A TROUBLESHOOTING GUIDE

XIII. THE CONTAMINANTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE: IDENTIFICATION AND CONTROL

XIV. THE PESTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE

XV. MUSHROOM GENETICS

APPENDICES

GLOSSARY

BIBLIOGRAPHY

INDEX

PHOTOGRAPHY AND ILLUSTRATION CREDITS

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

OCR
Spawning and Spawn Running in Bulk Subtrates/125

Figure 120

Psilocybe semilanceata mycelium running through pasteurized wheat

straw.
If the substrate has been filled into shelves, the spawn is broadcast over the surface and mixed in
with a pitchfork or by hand. With trays, a similar method can be used, or alternatively, the substrate
can be dumped out on a clean surface, mixed with spawn and then replaced in the trays. Substrates
from a bulk room are removed, mixed with spawn and then placed into the chosen container.

It is common procedure to level and compress the substrate to avoid dehydration caused by excessive air penetration. The degree of compression depends upon substrate structure. Long, airy
materials can be compacted more than short, dense ones. Commercial fray growers compact the
compost into the trays with a hydraulic press so that the compost surface resembles a table top. This
enables the application of an even casing layer.

Environmental Conditions
The required environmental conditions for spawn running are very specific and must be closely
monitored. Substrate temperatures are controlled by careful manipulation of the surrounding air
temperature. Heating and cooling equipment are helpful but not absolutely essential unless the outside climate is extreme. A well insulated room with provisions for fresh air entrance and exhaust air
exit should be adequate for most situations. The steady or periodic recirculation of room air by
means of a small fan helps to keep an even temperature throughout the room and guards against localized over-heating, especially in the uppermost containers. Humidity is extremely important at this
time and must be held at 90-100%. If the humidity falls below this level, water evaporates from the
substrate surface to the detriment of the growing mycelium. Humidification can be accomplished by
steam humidifiers or by cold water misters. If steam is used, care must be taken that the increase in
air temperature does not drive the substrate temperature above the optimal range. One common

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