The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home

Paul Stamets. The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home. - Agarikon press, 1983

Содержание

FOREWORD by Dr. Andrew Weil

PREFACE

I. INTRODUCTION TO MUSHROOM CULTURE

II. STERILE TECHNIQUE AND AGAR CULTURE

III. GRAIN CULTURE

IV. THE MUSHROOM GROWING ROOM

V. COMPOST PREPARATION

VI. NON-COMPOSTED SUBSTRATES

VII. SPAWNING AND SPAWN RUNNING IN BULK SUBSTRATES

VIII. THE CASING LAYER

IX. STRATEGIES FOR MUSHROOM FORMATION (PINHEAD INITIATION)

X. ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS: SUSTAINING THE MUSHROOM CROP

XL GROWING PARAMETERS FOR VARIOUS MUSHROOM SPECIES

XII. CULTIVATION PROBLEMS AND THEIR SOLUTIONS: A TROUBLESHOOTING GUIDE

XIII. THE CONTAMINANTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE: IDENTIFICATION AND CONTROL

XIV. THE PESTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE

XV. MUSHROOM GENETICS

APPENDICES

GLOSSARY

BIBLIOGRAPHY

INDEX

PHOTOGRAPHY AND ILLUSTRATION CREDITS

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

OCR
Non-Composfed Subtrates/ 119
The chopped straw is treated by pasteurization which can be carried out with live steam or hot
water. Presoaked to approximately 75% water, the straw is filled into a tunnel or steam room as described in the corn posting chapter. It is steamed for 2-4 hours at 1 40-150 °F., then cooled to 80°F.
and spawned. An alternative program calls for 1 2-24 hours at 1 22 °F. after the high temperature
pasteurization. This program is designed to promote beneficial microbial growth giving the straw a

higher degree of selectivity for mushroom mycelium.
The method best suited to the home cultivator is the hot water bath. Figure 111 illustrates a
simple system utilizing a 55 gallon drum and a propane burner. The drum is half filled with water
that is then heated to 1 60-1 70°F. Chopped dry straw is placed into the wire mesh basket and submerged in the hot water. (A weight is needed to keep the straw underwater.) After 30-45 minutes
the straw is removed from the water and allowed to drain. It is very important to let all loose water
run off.
Once drained, the straw is spread out on a clean surface and allowed to cool to 80 ° F. (or less),
at which point it can be spawned. The straw is evenly mixed with spawn and filled into trays, shelves
or plastic bags. Some compression of the straw into the container is desirable because the cropping
efficiency will be increased.
The use of plastic bags is a simple and efficient way to handle straw substrates. A five gallon bag
(1 -2 mils thick) is well suited to most situations. Two dozen nail sized holes equally spaced around
the bags provide aeration. Upon full colonization, the mycelia of species like Pleurofus osfreatus

Figure 116

Inoculating grain spawn onto the

cooled pasteurized straw.

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