The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home

Paul Stamets. The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home. - Agarikon press, 1983

Содержание

FOREWORD by Dr. Andrew Weil

PREFACE

I. INTRODUCTION TO MUSHROOM CULTURE

II. STERILE TECHNIQUE AND AGAR CULTURE

III. GRAIN CULTURE

IV. THE MUSHROOM GROWING ROOM

V. COMPOST PREPARATION

VI. NON-COMPOSTED SUBSTRATES

VII. SPAWNING AND SPAWN RUNNING IN BULK SUBSTRATES

VIII. THE CASING LAYER

IX. STRATEGIES FOR MUSHROOM FORMATION (PINHEAD INITIATION)

X. ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS: SUSTAINING THE MUSHROOM CROP

XL GROWING PARAMETERS FOR VARIOUS MUSHROOM SPECIES

XII. CULTIVATION PROBLEMS AND THEIR SOLUTIONS: A TROUBLESHOOTING GUIDE

XIII. THE CONTAMINANTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE: IDENTIFICATION AND CONTROL

XIV. THE PESTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE

XV. MUSHROOM GENETICS

APPENDICES

GLOSSARY

BIBLIOGRAPHY

INDEX

PHOTOGRAPHY AND ILLUSTRATION CREDITS

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

OCR
104/The Mushroom Cultivator

Bulk Room Filling Procedures
1.

2.
3.

4.

DAY
0

Fill as quickly as possible to minimize heat loss.
Compost should have good structure and optimum moisture content. Do not fill a dense,
overwet compost.
Fill evenly. Compost density is important. Avoid localized compaction as well as gaps.
Gaps or holes in the compost become air channels to the detriment of the surrounding
material. Be sure the compost presses firmly and evenly against all sides of the room.
Before filling the last three feet, put the inside board wall in place. Now fill the remaining
area. The compost should press firmly against the board wall.

BULK ROOM PHASE II PROCEDURES
Filling. Compost is brought into the room. If remote reading temperature sensors are
used, place 2-4 sensors in different locations within the compost, and one in the air
above. If remote sensors are not used, place one thermometer in the return air duct and
one downstream from the fan in the supply duct. The compost temperature should be
within the readings of these two air thermometers. Turn the fan on, close the fresh air

damper and re-circulate until 120°F. is reached. This should take 8-24 hours. Then
open the fresh air damper to the minimum setting, 8-10%.
Pasteurization: Allow the temperature to rise to 132-135°F. Adjust the fresh air
damper to hold this temperature for at least six hours and a maximum of ten hours.
Once completed, introduce sufficient fresh air to bring the temperature down to 1 22 °F.
This should take approximately 1 2 hours. Be sure to anticipate temperature trends and
adjust the fresh air accordingly.

1-2

2-10

4-10

Conditioning: By adjusting the amount of fresh air, the compost is held in the
118-122°F. range until all ammonia is gone. Fresh air should gradually be reduced as
thermogenesis subsides. The temperature in the return air duct should always be higher
than in the supply duct.
Cool-down: Once the ammonia content of the air is below 10 parts per million (ppm)
full fresh air is given to reduce the compost temperature to 80°F. The cool-down should
proceed as rapidly as possible.

Testing for Ammonia
The basic ammonia detection test has always been the sense of smell. The odor of ammonia

must be completely gone from the compost before it can be spawned. Odors are always good indicators of compost suitability. However, to be absolutely certain, other methods are also used.
saturated with a few
1. Cresyl Orange and filter paper: Pre-cut strips of white filter paper are
Expose
the paper to the
drops of cresyl orange liquid which turns the white paper yellow.

inside of the Phase II room or to the exhaust air of the bulk room. The paper can also be

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