The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home

Paul Stamets. The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home. - Agarikon press, 1983

Содержание

FOREWORD by Dr. Andrew Weil

PREFACE

I. INTRODUCTION TO MUSHROOM CULTURE

II. STERILE TECHNIQUE AND AGAR CULTURE

III. GRAIN CULTURE

IV. THE MUSHROOM GROWING ROOM

V. COMPOST PREPARATION

VI. NON-COMPOSTED SUBSTRATES

VII. SPAWNING AND SPAWN RUNNING IN BULK SUBSTRATES

VIII. THE CASING LAYER

IX. STRATEGIES FOR MUSHROOM FORMATION (PINHEAD INITIATION)

X. ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS: SUSTAINING THE MUSHROOM CROP

XL GROWING PARAMETERS FOR VARIOUS MUSHROOM SPECIES

XII. CULTIVATION PROBLEMS AND THEIR SOLUTIONS: A TROUBLESHOOTING GUIDE

XIII. THE CONTAMINANTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE: IDENTIFICATION AND CONTROL

XIV. THE PESTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE

XV. MUSHROOM GENETICS

APPENDICES

GLOSSARY

BIBLIOGRAPHY

INDEX

PHOTOGRAPHY AND ILLUSTRATION CREDITS

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

OCR
102/The Mushroom Cultivator
temperatures becomes possible and optimum temperatures within the mass can be tightly regulated.

Bulk Room Design Features
The size of the bulk room varies according to individual needs, but should be large enough that
there is sufficient compost mass to supply heat.
1. At a fill depth of 4-5 feet, one ton of compost requires approximately 8-1 0 sq. ft. of floor
space.

2. Bulk rooms are well insulated. The walls and door are R-19; the ceiling is R-30 minimum. A vapor barrier should protect all insulation.
3. The room has a double floor. The bottom floor is concrete, insulated to R-19 with styrofoam or other water impervious material, and covered with tar or temperature resistant
plastic as a vapor barrier. The compost floor is 12-18 inches above the bottom floor, and
is made of 4 x 4's with spacers in between to leave 20% air space. This floor is removable
to permit periodic cleaning.
4. The interior walls and ceiling are made of exterior grade plywood, treated with a wood
preservative or marine epoxy. Allow 1/4 inch for expansion. Caulk or seal with fiberglass
tape.

5. The room must be airtight. Caulk all cracks and corners.
6. The access door runs the width of the room for easy loading and unloading. An airtight
seal is essential.

7. A wood plank wall is inserted before the access door to prevent the compost from pressing against it. The plank wall is held in place by runners on either wall.
8. The ventilation system is powered by a centrifugal, high pressure belt driven blower, with
a capacity of 90-1 20 CFM per ton of compost at a static pressure of up to 4 inches of water gauge. The recirculation duct comes out on the top of the back wall and down to the
fan. The supply duct goes from the fan to the air chamber under the compost floor. All
ductwork should be insulated.
9. The fresh air inlet and damper are located before the fan. This damper also regulates the

recirculated air. The fresh air should be filtered.
1 0. The exhaust outlet is located on the access door. This is a free swinging damper that operates on room pressure. This outlet is covered by a coarse filter.

11. Standard inside dimensions are 6-12 feet wide by 8-10 feet high.
1 2.

For better temperature control the bulk room should be built inside a larger building, like a
garage, where temperaure differences are less extreme. The introduction of cold fresh air
hampers the process by neutralizing the compost heat.

A simple variation of this bulk room is a well insulated bin. The bin is constructed using the

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