The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home

Paul Stamets. The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home. - Agarikon press, 1983

Содержание

FOREWORD by Dr. Andrew Weil

PREFACE

I. INTRODUCTION TO MUSHROOM CULTURE

II. STERILE TECHNIQUE AND AGAR CULTURE

III. GRAIN CULTURE

IV. THE MUSHROOM GROWING ROOM

V. COMPOST PREPARATION

VI. NON-COMPOSTED SUBSTRATES

VII. SPAWNING AND SPAWN RUNNING IN BULK SUBSTRATES

VIII. THE CASING LAYER

IX. STRATEGIES FOR MUSHROOM FORMATION (PINHEAD INITIATION)

X. ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS: SUSTAINING THE MUSHROOM CROP

XL GROWING PARAMETERS FOR VARIOUS MUSHROOM SPECIES

XII. CULTIVATION PROBLEMS AND THEIR SOLUTIONS: A TROUBLESHOOTING GUIDE

XIII. THE CONTAMINANTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE: IDENTIFICATION AND CONTROL

XIV. THE PESTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE

XV. MUSHROOM GENETICS

APPENDICES

GLOSSARY

BIBLIOGRAPHY

INDEX

PHOTOGRAPHY AND ILLUSTRATION CREDITS

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

OCR
98/The Mushroom Cultivator
be slow and deliberate. Only when the compost threatens to overheat should maximum fresh air be
introduced. This is particularly common directly after pasteurization.

Peak microbial activity normally occurs 24-48 hours after pasteurization. As Phase II progresses and the food supply diminishes, this activity begins to slow. Compost temperatures should
begin to drop on their own. As they drop, the fresh air supply should be decreased, thus slowly raising the air temperature as the compost reaches the required temperature zones. If the fresh air
minimum is reached and the compost temperatures are still dropping, a supplemental heat source
must be installed.

Phase II Room Design
The Phase II room can be a special room set aside solely for this purpose (the norm on tray
farms) or it can be in the same room where cropping occurs. Design features are critical for its success and should be strictly adhered to. These features are:
1. Adequate insulation: Insulate to a R value of 19 for walls and a minimum of 30 for the ceiling. A vapor barrier is needed to protect the insulation. (A layer of polyethylene is cheap and
effective.)

2. The room must be functionally airtight. The door should form a tight seal. Any cracks or
openings allow the passage of flies.
3. The ventilation system uses a backward-curved centrifugal fan driven by pulleys and belts,
and whose speed can be varied. The fan should be capable of moving air at 1 cubic foot per
minute (CFM) per square foot of compost surface area. A perforated polythene duct runs the
length of the room and directs the air either straight down the center aisle or across the ceil-

ing to the side walls. High velocity airflow is necessary to maintain even temperatures
throughout as well as to keep the room under positive pressure.
4. A fresh air vent is located before the fan. This damper also regulates recirculated air. (See
Fig. 73).
5. Filters are placed before the fresh air inlet. These filters are important as protection against
flies, dust and spores. High efficiency spore filters are commonly used for the incoming fresh
air. A pre-filter placed upstream of the main filter will increase its life. Recirculated air should
never be filtered during Phase II because of its high moisture content.
6. At the opposite end of the room from the fresh air vent are exhaust louvers operating on air
pressure. This exhaust air outlet must be screened from the inside.
7. If steam is used for boosting temperature, pipes can be run the length of the floor along the
side walls discharging outwards. Steam can also be discharged directly into the air duct after
the fan. High output electric space heaters can also be used.

Filling Procedures
Depending on the growing system chosen, the compost is loaded into trays, shelves or a bulk

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