The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home

Paul Stamets. The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home. - Agarikon press, 1983

Содержание

FOREWORD by Dr. Andrew Weil

PREFACE

I. INTRODUCTION TO MUSHROOM CULTURE

II. STERILE TECHNIQUE AND AGAR CULTURE

III. GRAIN CULTURE

IV. THE MUSHROOM GROWING ROOM

V. COMPOST PREPARATION

VI. NON-COMPOSTED SUBSTRATES

VII. SPAWNING AND SPAWN RUNNING IN BULK SUBSTRATES

VIII. THE CASING LAYER

IX. STRATEGIES FOR MUSHROOM FORMATION (PINHEAD INITIATION)

X. ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS: SUSTAINING THE MUSHROOM CROP

XL GROWING PARAMETERS FOR VARIOUS MUSHROOM SPECIES

XII. CULTIVATION PROBLEMS AND THEIR SOLUTIONS: A TROUBLESHOOTING GUIDE

XIII. THE CONTAMINANTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE: IDENTIFICATION AND CONTROL

XIV. THE PESTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE

XV. MUSHROOM GENETICS

APPENDICES

GLOSSARY

BIBLIOGRAPHY

INDEX

PHOTOGRAPHY AND ILLUSTRATION CREDITS

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

OCR
96/The Mushroom Cultivator
compost wet weight and is diluted 1:2 with water for easy application. Vegetable oil is sprayed onto
the compost the day of fill at a rate of 1 0 ml per pound of compost wet weight. Even application is
important to avoid creating hot spots.
Compost supplementation with soluble carbohydrates or vegetable oils is highly recommended, especially for those planning a Phase II without steam or with only limited supplemental
heating. Hence, this type of supplementation is particularly appropriate for the home cultivator.

PHASE II COMPOSTING
While Phase I is a combination of biological and chemical processes, Phase II is purely biological. In fact, Phase II can be considered a process of microbial husbandry. By bringing the compost
indoors into specially designed rooms, the environmental factors of temperature, humidity and fresh
air can be controlled to such a degree that conditions for growth of select microbial groups can be
maximized. These thermophilic and thermotolerant groups and their temperature ranges are:
Bacteria: 100-170°F. Different species of bacteria are active throughout this range so an optimum can not be given. At temperatures above 1 30°F. bacteria dominate and are responsible for
the ammonification that occurs at these temperatures. The most common bacteria found by resear-

chers are Pseudomonas species.

Actinomycetes: 11 5-1 40°F. with an optimum temperature range of 125-132°F. The most
common species are found in the genera Streptomyces and Thermomonospora. Work done by
Stanek (1971) has shown that actinomycetes and bacteria are mutually stimulatory, resulting in
greater efficiency when working together.

Fungi: 110-130°F. with an optimum temperature of 118-122°F. Common genera are

Humicola and Torula. Recent research indicates that these fungi are the most efficient de-ammonifiers, which has led to a more general use of their temperature range for Phase II conditioning.
The basic function of these microorganisms is to utilize and thereby exhaust the readily available carbohydrates and the free ammonia. Ammonia in particular must be completely removed be-

'4

TIME
REQUIRED



TO REMOVE
AMMONIA
(DAYS)

2
I

F

Figure 95 Temperature vs.
ammonia utilization by
microbial populations.
(After Ross, 1978)

PDF compression, OCR, web-optimization with CVISION's PdfCompressor