The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home

Paul Stamets. The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home. - Agarikon press, 1983

Содержание

FOREWORD by Dr. Andrew Weil

PREFACE

I. INTRODUCTION TO MUSHROOM CULTURE

II. STERILE TECHNIQUE AND AGAR CULTURE

III. GRAIN CULTURE

IV. THE MUSHROOM GROWING ROOM

V. COMPOST PREPARATION

VI. NON-COMPOSTED SUBSTRATES

VII. SPAWNING AND SPAWN RUNNING IN BULK SUBSTRATES

VIII. THE CASING LAYER

IX. STRATEGIES FOR MUSHROOM FORMATION (PINHEAD INITIATION)

X. ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS: SUSTAINING THE MUSHROOM CROP

XL GROWING PARAMETERS FOR VARIOUS MUSHROOM SPECIES

XII. CULTIVATION PROBLEMS AND THEIR SOLUTIONS: A TROUBLESHOOTING GUIDE

XIII. THE CONTAMINANTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE: IDENTIFICATION AND CONTROL

XIV. THE PESTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE

XV. MUSHROOM GENETICS

APPENDICES

GLOSSARY

BIBLIOGRAPHY

INDEX

PHOTOGRAPHY AND ILLUSTRATION CREDITS

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

OCR
90/The Mushroom Cultivator

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should be tightly compressed with the middle of the pile remaining loose. Use the pile
formers to make the stack and stomp the sides from the top to achieve ample compression. Water dry areas.
First turn: Water as needed. Move the center anaerobic zone to the outside of the new
pile and the outside zone to the center. Keep the pile height and length constant by reducing the width as decomposition proceeds.

1 0-1 2

Second turn: Add the gypsum and water as needed. Distribute the zone of actinomycetes evenly throughout.

13-15

Third turn: The actinomycete zone should be evident throughout. Strong actinomycete growth may cause excessive drying, so be sure to check moisture content and water

as needed. The smell of ammonia should be slight. Build the new pile only 24 inches
high and 4-5 feet wide. Distribute the actinomycetes evenly throughout.
15-17

Fourth turn: The compost should now appear dark brown and well flecked with actinomycetes. All traces of ammonia should be gone. Moisture content should be approximately 67-70% and the pH 7.0-7.5. If this is not the case, continue the process turning
at 2 day intervals until this condition is reached. The pile height may vary between
1 6-24 inches and is designed solely to promote optimum conditions for the growth of
the actinomycetes—temperatures of 120-135°F.

Once finished, this compost is normally pasteurized at 135°F. for four hours. If pasteurization
is impossible, discard the cool outer shell and utilize the areas showing strong actinomycefe activity.
Although these areas will not be free from all pests and competitors, they should provide a reasonably productive substrate. The aspect and characteristics of a properly prepared Long Compost
should conform to the guidelines for compost after Phase II. (See Aspect of the Finished Compost

on page 105 and Color Plate 8).

Short Composting
Commercial Agaricus growers uniformly base their composting procedures on the methodology developed by Dr. James Sinden, who called his technique "Short Composting" in reference to
the short period of time involved. Dr. Sinden's process is centered around the fast acting chemical
reactions occurring in zone 3. Besides the shorter preparation time, this process also results in a
greater preservation of dry matter, thus retaining valuable nutrients. Figure 89 illustrates the zonation during short composting.

Without commercial composting equipment, approximating the temperature conditions of
Short Composting is very difficult. However, it does provide a model for optimum composting and
can be approached by adhering to the basic principles discussed in this chapter. The Short Cornposting procedure is outlined below.

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