The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home

Paul Stamets. The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home. - Agarikon press, 1983

Содержание

FOREWORD by Dr. Andrew Weil

PREFACE

I. INTRODUCTION TO MUSHROOM CULTURE

II. STERILE TECHNIQUE AND AGAR CULTURE

III. GRAIN CULTURE

IV. THE MUSHROOM GROWING ROOM

V. COMPOST PREPARATION

VI. NON-COMPOSTED SUBSTRATES

VII. SPAWNING AND SPAWN RUNNING IN BULK SUBSTRATES

VIII. THE CASING LAYER

IX. STRATEGIES FOR MUSHROOM FORMATION (PINHEAD INITIATION)

X. ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS: SUSTAINING THE MUSHROOM CROP

XL GROWING PARAMETERS FOR VARIOUS MUSHROOM SPECIES

XII. CULTIVATION PROBLEMS AND THEIR SOLUTIONS: A TROUBLESHOOTING GUIDE

XIII. THE CONTAMINANTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE: IDENTIFICATION AND CONTROL

XIV. THE PESTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE

XV. MUSHROOM GENETICS

APPENDICES

GLOSSARY

BIBLIOGRAPHY

INDEX

PHOTOGRAPHY AND ILLUSTRATION CREDITS

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

OCR
88/The Mushroom Cultivator
In the early stages the temperature stratification in the pile is quite pronounced. Outer areas are
cool and dry from the air flowing inward and the accompanying evaporation. These outer areas are
watered during turning and moved to the center of the newly built pile and the center areas are relocated to the outside. Being aware of the varied rate of decomposition in a stratified pile and compen-

sating during turning maintains the important homogeneous character of the pile.
Supplements deleted at make-up should be added during the turning cycle. Gypsum is normally added at the second turn. Adding gypsum any earlier is believed to depress ammonia production.
Until some decomposition has occurred, the beneficial action of gypsum will not be realized. As
with other supplements, gypsum is mixed in as evenly as possible.

Tern peratu re
Environmental conditions in the compost are specifically designed to facilitate growth of beneficial aerobic microorganisms. Given the proper balance of raw materials, air and water, a continuous
succession of microbial populations produces temperatures up to 1 80°F. These microbes can be
divided into two groups according to their temperature requirements. Mesophiles are active under

90°F. and thermophiles are active from 90-160°F. The action of these microbial groups during
the composting process is summarized in the following paragraphs.
During pre-composting mesophilic bacteria and fungi, utilizing available carbohydrates, attack

Figure 87

Standard temperature zonation in a compost pile.

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