The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home

Paul Stamets. The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home. - Agarikon press, 1983

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Содержание

FOREWORD by Dr. Andrew Weil

PREFACE

I. INTRODUCTION TO MUSHROOM CULTURE

II. STERILE TECHNIQUE AND AGAR CULTURE

III. GRAIN CULTURE

IV. THE MUSHROOM GROWING ROOM

V. COMPOST PREPARATION

VI. NON-COMPOSTED SUBSTRATES

VII. SPAWNING AND SPAWN RUNNING IN BULK SUBSTRATES

VIII. THE CASING LAYER

IX. STRATEGIES FOR MUSHROOM FORMATION (PINHEAD INITIATION)

X. ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS: SUSTAINING THE MUSHROOM CROP

XL GROWING PARAMETERS FOR VARIOUS MUSHROOM SPECIES

XII. CULTIVATION PROBLEMS AND THEIR SOLUTIONS: A TROUBLESHOOTING GUIDE

XIII. THE CONTAMINANTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE: IDENTIFICATION AND CONTROL

XIV. THE PESTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE

XV. MUSHROOM GENETICS

APPENDICES

GLOSSARY

BIBLIOGRAPHY

INDEX

PHOTOGRAPHY AND ILLUSTRATION CREDITS

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

OCR
Compost Preparation/81

Group VI: Hay
Alfalfa—2.0-2.5% N
Clover—2% N
Hay is useful for boosting initial temperatures in synthetic composts. Hay contains substantial
quantities of carbohydrates which help build the microbial population. Yet another advantage is the
relatively high nitrogen content in alfalfa and clover. Use at a rate of 20% of the basic starting material (dry weight).

Group VII: Minerals
Gypsum—Calcium sulfate
Gypsum is an essential element for all composts. Its action, largely chemical in nature, facilitates proper composting. its effects are:
1. To improve the physical structure of the compost by causing aggregation of colloidal particles. This produces a more granular, open structure which results in larger air spaces and
improved aeration.
2. To increase the water holding capacity, while decreasing the danger of over-wetting. Loose
water is bound to the straw by colloidal particles.

3. To counteract harmfully high concentrations of the elements K, Mg, P and Na should they
occur, thereby preventing a greasy condition in the compost.

4. To supply the calcium necessary for mushroom metabolism.
Gypsum should be added at a rate of 50-100 lbs per dry ton of ingredients. When supplementing with chicken manure, it is advisable to use the high rate.

Limestone flour—Calcium carbonate
Limestone is used when one or more supplements are very acidic and need to be buffered. A
good example of this is grape pomace, which has a pH of 4. Because it is added in large quantities,
grape pomace could affect the composting process which normally occurs under alkaline conditions.

Group VIII: Starting materials
Horse manure—0.9-1 .2% N
Straw, all types—0.5-O.7% N

Compost Formulas
The following formulas for high yield compost are commercially proven. If an ingredient is not
available locally, substitute one that is. The aim of the formula is to achieve a nitrogen content of
1 .5-1 .7% at the initial make-up of the compost pile.
In order for these formulas to be effective, the moisture content and nitrogen content must be
correct. Moisture level is determined by weighing 1 00 grams of the material, drying it in an oven at
200 ° F. for several hours, and then reweighing it. The difference is the percent moisture. Be sure
the sample is representative. The nitrogen content (protein divided by 6.25) is always listed with

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