The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home

Paul Stamets. The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home. - Agarikon press, 1983

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Содержание

FOREWORD by Dr. Andrew Weil

PREFACE

I. INTRODUCTION TO MUSHROOM CULTURE

II. STERILE TECHNIQUE AND AGAR CULTURE

III. GRAIN CULTURE

IV. THE MUSHROOM GROWING ROOM

V. COMPOST PREPARATION

VI. NON-COMPOSTED SUBSTRATES

VII. SPAWNING AND SPAWN RUNNING IN BULK SUBSTRATES

VIII. THE CASING LAYER

IX. STRATEGIES FOR MUSHROOM FORMATION (PINHEAD INITIATION)

X. ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS: SUSTAINING THE MUSHROOM CROP

XL GROWING PARAMETERS FOR VARIOUS MUSHROOM SPECIES

XII. CULTIVATION PROBLEMS AND THEIR SOLUTIONS: A TROUBLESHOOTING GUIDE

XIII. THE CONTAMINANTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE: IDENTIFICATION AND CONTROL

XIV. THE PESTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE

XV. MUSHROOM GENETICS

APPENDICES

GLOSSARY

BIBLIOGRAPHY

INDEX

PHOTOGRAPHY AND ILLUSTRATION CREDITS

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

OCR
Grain Culture/49

inoculation of Grain from Grain Masters
Once fully colonized, these grain masters are now used for the further production of grain
spawn in quart or ½ gallon containers. Masters must be transferred within a few days of their full colonization; otherwise the myceliated kernels do not break apart easily. A step by step description of
the grain-to-grain transfer technique follows.
1.

Carefully scrutinize each jar for any signs of contamination. Look for such abnormalities as:
heavy growth; regions of sparse, inhibited growth; slimy or wet looking kernels (an indication of bacteria); exploded kernels with pallid, irregular margins; and any unusual colorations. If in doubt lift the lid and smell the spawn—a sour "rotten apple" or otherwise pungent odor is usually an indication of contamination by bacteria. Jars having this scent should
be discarded. (Sometimes spawn partially contaminated with bacteria can be cased and
fruited). Do NOT use any jar with a suspect appearance for subsequent inoculations.

2. After choosing the best looking spawn masters, break up the grain in each jar by shaking

hand. The grain should
the jars against a tire or slamming them against the palm of
break easily into individual kernels. 'Shake as many masters as needed knowing that each
jar can amply inoculate ten to twelve quart jars or seven to nine half gallon jars.

Once completed, SET THE SPAWN JARS ON A SEPARATE SHELF AND WAIT
TWELVE TO TWENTY-FOUR HOURS BEFORE USING. This waiting period is important because some of the spawn may not recover, suffering usually from bacterial contamination. Had these jars been used, the contamination rate would have been multiplied by a
factor of ten.
3. Inspect the jars again for signs of contamination. After twelve to twenty-four hours, the my-

celium shows signs of renewed growth.
4. If the masters had been shaken the night before, the inoculations can begin the following

morning or as soon as the receiving jars (G-2) have cooled. Again, wash the lab, be personally clean and wear newly laundered clothes.

Place 10 sterilized grain-filled jars on the work-bench in the sterile room. Loosen each
of the lids so they can be removed with one hand. Gently shake the master jar until the
grain spawn separates into individual kernels. Hold the master in your preferred hand. Remove the master's lid and then with the other hand open the first jar to be inoculated. With a
rolling of the wrist, pour one tenth of the master's contents into the first jar, replace its lid
and continue to the second, third, fourth jars, until the set is completed. When this first sef is
done, firmly secure the lids. Replace the lid on the now empty spawn master jar and put it
aside. Take each newly inoculated jar, and with a combination of rolling and shaking, distribute the mycelium covered kernels evenly throughout.
5. Incubate at the temperature appropriate for the species being cultivated. In a week the

mycelium should totally permeate the grain. Designated G-2, these jars can be used for further inoculations, as spawn for the inoculation of bulk substrates, or as a fruiting medium.
Some species are less aggressive than others. Agaricus brunnescens, for instance, can take up

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