The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home

Paul Stamets. The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home. - Agarikon press, 1983

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Содержание

FOREWORD by Dr. Andrew Weil

PREFACE

I. INTRODUCTION TO MUSHROOM CULTURE

II. STERILE TECHNIQUE AND AGAR CULTURE

III. GRAIN CULTURE

IV. THE MUSHROOM GROWING ROOM

V. COMPOST PREPARATION

VI. NON-COMPOSTED SUBSTRATES

VII. SPAWNING AND SPAWN RUNNING IN BULK SUBSTRATES

VIII. THE CASING LAYER

IX. STRATEGIES FOR MUSHROOM FORMATION (PINHEAD INITIATION)

X. ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS: SUSTAINING THE MUSHROOM CROP

XL GROWING PARAMETERS FOR VARIOUS MUSHROOM SPECIES

XII. CULTIVATION PROBLEMS AND THEIR SOLUTIONS: A TROUBLESHOOTING GUIDE

XIII. THE CONTAMINANTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE: IDENTIFICATION AND CONTROL

XIV. THE PESTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE

XV. MUSHROOM GENETICS

APPENDICES

GLOSSARY

BIBLIOGRAPHY

INDEX

PHOTOGRAPHY AND ILLUSTRATION CREDITS

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

OCR
48/The Mushroom Cultivator
from
mence. Once again, good hygiene is of the upmost importance. When transferring
which
contaminants
can
replicate.
In
agar
culture,
the
agar to grain, another dimension is added in
easily
seen.
In
mycelium grows over a flat, two dimensional surface. If contamination is present, it is
play
and
contaminants
become
grain culture, however, the added dimension of depth comes into
more elusive, often escaping detection from the most discerning eye. If not noticed, contamination
will be spread when this spawn is used to inoculate more sterilized grain.
Before conducting transfers, take precautions to insure the sterile quality of the inoculation environment. After cleaning the room, do not jeopardize its cleanliness by wearing soiled clothes. Few
cultivators take into consideration that they are a major source of contamination. In fact, the human
body is in itself a habitat crawling with bacteria, microscopic mites, and resplendent with spores of

plants and fungi.

When satisfied that all these preparatory conditions are in force, the making of spawn can
begin.

Inoculation of Sterilized Grain from Agar Media
Select a vigorously growing culture whose mycelium covers no more than ¾ of the agar's surface. Cultures that have entirely overrun the petri dish should be avoided because contaminants
often enter along the margin of the petri dish. If that outer edge is grown over with mycelium, these
invaders can go undetected. Since this peripheral mycelium can become laden with contaminant
spores, any grain inoculated with it would become spoiled.
Flame sterilize a scalpel and cut out a triangular wedge of mycelium covered agar using the
technique described for doing agar-to-agar transfers. With careful, deliberate movements quickly
transfer the wedge to an awaiting jar, exposing the grain for a minimal amount of time. For each
transfer, flame sterilize the scalpel and inoculate wedges of mycelium into as many jars as desired. A
petri dish two thirds covered with mycelium should amply inoculate 6-8 quart jars of grain. (A maximum of 10-12 jars is possible). The more mycelia transferred, the faster the colonization and the
less chance of contamination. Since these jars become the "master cultures", do everything possi-

ble to guarantee the highest standard of purity.

The authors recommend a "double wedge" transfer technique whereby a single triangular
wedge of mycelium is cut in half, both pieces are speared and then inserted into an awaiting jar of
sterilized grain. Jars inoculated with this method grow out far faster than the single wedge transfer
technique.
Loosening the lids prior to inoculation facilitates speedy transfers. As each agar-to-grain transfer
is completed, replace the lid and continue to the next inoculation. Once the set is finished, tightly secure the lids and shake each jar thoroughly to evenly distribute the mycelial wedges. In the course of
shaking, each wedge travels throughout the grain media leaving mycelial fragments adhering to the
grain kernels. If a wedge sticks to the glass, distribution is hampered and spawn running is inhibited.
This problem is usually an indication of agar media that has been too thinly poured or has been
allowed to dehydrate. Once shaken, incubate the spawn jars at the appopriate temperature. (A second shaking may be necessary on Day 4 or Day 5). In general, the grain should be fully colonized
with mycelium in seven to ten days.

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