The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home

Paul Stamets. The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home. - Agarikon press, 1983

: [url=http://txt.drevle.com/text/stamets-mushroom_cultivator-a_practical_guide-1983/374]Paul Stamets. The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home. - Agarikon press, 1983[/url]
 

Содержание

FOREWORD by Dr. Andrew Weil

PREFACE

I. INTRODUCTION TO MUSHROOM CULTURE

II. STERILE TECHNIQUE AND AGAR CULTURE

III. GRAIN CULTURE

IV. THE MUSHROOM GROWING ROOM

V. COMPOST PREPARATION

VI. NON-COMPOSTED SUBSTRATES

VII. SPAWNING AND SPAWN RUNNING IN BULK SUBSTRATES

VIII. THE CASING LAYER

IX. STRATEGIES FOR MUSHROOM FORMATION (PINHEAD INITIATION)

X. ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS: SUSTAINING THE MUSHROOM CROP

XL GROWING PARAMETERS FOR VARIOUS MUSHROOM SPECIES

XII. CULTIVATION PROBLEMS AND THEIR SOLUTIONS: A TROUBLESHOOTING GUIDE

XIII. THE CONTAMINANTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE: IDENTIFICATION AND CONTROL

XIV. THE PESTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE

XV. MUSHROOM GENETICS

APPENDICES

GLOSSARY

BIBLIOGRAPHY

INDEX

PHOTOGRAPHY AND ILLUSTRATION CREDITS

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

OCR
352/Appendix II: Laminar Flow Systems
cacy, they are considerably more expensive than the kind needed for mushroom and plant culture.
Laminar flow systems for tissue culturists operate on a reverse principle of the one designed for
use with toxic substances. Air is forced through a micron filter to the work area, creating a positive
pressure sterile wind in which to conduct mycelial transfers. These types of hoods are perfect for
pouring media, maintaining pure mycelia and inoculating spawn containers. Since they greatly reduce the waste caused by contamination, their cost is soon offset by the savings realized. A laminar
flow hood is a low maintenance, affordable and appropriate technology for the serious home cultivator.

An alternative to building a laminar flow hood is the construction of a laminar flow wall or ceiling. A laminar flow ceiling is preferable because the draft is directed downwards to the floor where it
exists through evenly placed pressure activated dampers. When a wall or ceiling is composed of micron filters, the air is usually drawn from the outside where the prefilters can be changed without entering the sterile laboratory. Any contaminant spores tracked in on the shoes of workers are kept
close to the floor and is immediately swept away by the flow of sterile air. The atmosphere in a this
type of sterile room is fully exchanged 1 0-20 times per hour.
Foremost, tissue culturists are interested in preventing contamination from occurring, not from
spreading. They are concerned with creating sterile media and maintaining the purity of cultures. A
laminar flow hood is of little value in helping a cultivator isolate a colony of mushroom mycelium
away from, for instance, a green mold on a petri dish. The turbulence generated from the hood
would free thousands of spores, some of which would adhere to the surface of the sterile media, germinate and produce more spores. In these cases, a laminar flow hood is best used as an air cleaner
prior to isolating a culture away from a contaminant. Several minutes after it has been turned off and
the air currents have settled, transfers can be made away from neighboring contaminants with little
danger of airborne spores.

Although sterile work can be conducted without a laminar flow system, they have become a
standard piece of equipment in professional spawn laboratories and increasingly in the sterile rooms
of many home cultivators.

PDF compression, OCR, web-optimization with CVISION's PdfCompressor