The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home

Paul Stamets. The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home. - Agarikon press, 1983

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Содержание

FOREWORD by Dr. Andrew Weil

PREFACE

I. INTRODUCTION TO MUSHROOM CULTURE

II. STERILE TECHNIQUE AND AGAR CULTURE

III. GRAIN CULTURE

IV. THE MUSHROOM GROWING ROOM

V. COMPOST PREPARATION

VI. NON-COMPOSTED SUBSTRATES

VII. SPAWNING AND SPAWN RUNNING IN BULK SUBSTRATES

VIII. THE CASING LAYER

IX. STRATEGIES FOR MUSHROOM FORMATION (PINHEAD INITIATION)

X. ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS: SUSTAINING THE MUSHROOM CROP

XL GROWING PARAMETERS FOR VARIOUS MUSHROOM SPECIES

XII. CULTIVATION PROBLEMS AND THEIR SOLUTIONS: A TROUBLESHOOTING GUIDE

XIII. THE CONTAMINANTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE: IDENTIFICATION AND CONTROL

XIV. THE PESTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE

XV. MUSHROOM GENETICS

APPENDICES

GLOSSARY

BIBLIOGRAPHY

INDEX

PHOTOGRAPHY AND ILLUSTRATION CREDITS

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

OCR
The Contaminants of Mushroom Culture/313

TRICHOTHECIUM
Class: Fungi Imperlecti
Order: Moniliales
Family: Moniliaceae
Common Name: Pink Mold.
Greek Root: From "trichos" meaning hairy
and "theke" meaning sac or capsule.

Habitat and Frequency of Occurrence:
For the most part, a saprophyte, rarely encountered in spawn making even though it is
one of the many microflora associated with

grain. Trichothecium is an occasional contaminant in agar culture and in poorly prepared or immature composts.

Medium Through Which Contamination Is Spread: Primarily an airborne contaminant.

Figure 227 Drawing of conidia and sporulating structure of Trichothecium.

Measures of Control: Air filtration and maintenance of good hygiene in the laboratory.
Macroscopic Appearance: Mycelium initially whitish; soon pinkish with spore production; and
typically slow growing on malt agars. Trichothecium is a powdery Penicillium type mold.
Microscopic Characteristics: Conidia measuring 12-18 x 4-10 microns; colorless to brightly
colored; two celled; pear shaped, ellipsoid or ovoid; borne in clusters with the basal cell being smaller than the terminal one; and positioned at the apex of tall, thin, unbranched, but septate conidiophores. Spore bunches are attached to one another either in a chain-like fashion or in loose groups
but not lineally.

History, Use and/or Medical Implications: One mold notable. Trichothecium roseum Link ex
Fr. secretes an antibiotic (trichothecin) that is toxic to bacteria, fungi and animals.
Comments: More frequently seen in the course of agar culture than on grain, this contaminant can
become a formidable problem if not detected early, and if large spore populations are permitted to
develop within the laboratory.
Also occurring on compost and occasionally on the casing soil, particularly where nitrogen

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