The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home

Paul Stamets. The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home. - Agarikon press, 1983

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Содержание

FOREWORD by Dr. Andrew Weil

PREFACE

I. INTRODUCTION TO MUSHROOM CULTURE

II. STERILE TECHNIQUE AND AGAR CULTURE

III. GRAIN CULTURE

IV. THE MUSHROOM GROWING ROOM

V. COMPOST PREPARATION

VI. NON-COMPOSTED SUBSTRATES

VII. SPAWNING AND SPAWN RUNNING IN BULK SUBSTRATES

VIII. THE CASING LAYER

IX. STRATEGIES FOR MUSHROOM FORMATION (PINHEAD INITIATION)

X. ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS: SUSTAINING THE MUSHROOM CROP

XL GROWING PARAMETERS FOR VARIOUS MUSHROOM SPECIES

XII. CULTIVATION PROBLEMS AND THEIR SOLUTIONS: A TROUBLESHOOTING GUIDE

XIII. THE CONTAMINANTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE: IDENTIFICATION AND CONTROL

XIV. THE PESTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE

XV. MUSHROOM GENETICS

APPENDICES

GLOSSARY

BIBLIOGRAPHY

INDEX

PHOTOGRAPHY AND ILLUSTRATION CREDITS

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

OCR
The Contaminants of Mushroom Culture/307

History, Use and/or Medical Implications: Some species possibly toxic, It has been suggested
that this mold secretes a sweet odor nauseous to some mushroom workers and possibly the cause
of a little understood respiratory illness. Not much is known.

Comments: Sepedonium spores are noted for their heat resistance. It is a whitish mold until the
yellow conidia are produced. On malt agar media, Sepedonium is fast running, and out-grows most
mushroom mycelia. When the two fungi grow within close proximity toone another, a line of inhibition usually develops between the two. If conidiospores or chlamydospores are not produced, this
mold is difficult to identify. The conidiophores are indistinct, very much resembling its own myceliurn. From the authors' experience this contaminant is a vigorous competitor on agar media. Ifs appearance necessitates a thorough cleaning of the laboratory and spawn incubation environment. If
this mold contaminates grain spawn and goes undetected, use of this spawn in subequent inoculations would be disastrous.

The second site of contamination is horse manure/straw compost where it most frequently appears during spawn run. Only detrimental when large outbreaks occur, Sepedonium's presence on

compost can be traced to insufficient pasteurization or spent compost residues in the trays or
shelves. Although not regarded as a serious competitor on mushroom compost, Sepeclonium is another fungus believed to be a food source for mites (Kneebone, 1961).

Sepedonium, like Mycogone, is an imperfect state of Hypomyces, a common parasite on
mushrooms. In the wild, Sepedonium chiysosperma parasitizes Boletus species (particularly B.
chiysenteron) and causes them to abort. The chlamydospores of Sepedonium are generally similar
to Mycogone.
See also Mucor and Mycelia Sterilia, two fast running whitish molds on agar media.

Figure 223 Sepedonium mold competing with Psilocybe cubensis mycelia on
malt agar media.

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