The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home

Paul Stamets. The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home. - Agarikon press, 1983

: [url=http://txt.drevle.com/text/stamets-mushroom_cultivator-a_practical_guide-1983/327]Paul Stamets. The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home. - Agarikon press, 1983[/url]
 

Содержание

FOREWORD by Dr. Andrew Weil

PREFACE

I. INTRODUCTION TO MUSHROOM CULTURE

II. STERILE TECHNIQUE AND AGAR CULTURE

III. GRAIN CULTURE

IV. THE MUSHROOM GROWING ROOM

V. COMPOST PREPARATION

VI. NON-COMPOSTED SUBSTRATES

VII. SPAWNING AND SPAWN RUNNING IN BULK SUBSTRATES

VIII. THE CASING LAYER

IX. STRATEGIES FOR MUSHROOM FORMATION (PINHEAD INITIATION)

X. ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS: SUSTAINING THE MUSHROOM CROP

XL GROWING PARAMETERS FOR VARIOUS MUSHROOM SPECIES

XII. CULTIVATION PROBLEMS AND THEIR SOLUTIONS: A TROUBLESHOOTING GUIDE

XIII. THE CONTAMINANTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE: IDENTIFICATION AND CONTROL

XIV. THE PESTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE

XV. MUSHROOM GENETICS

APPENDICES

GLOSSARY

BIBLIOGRAPHY

INDEX

PHOTOGRAPHY AND ILLUSTRATION CREDITS

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

OCR
The Contaminants of Mushroom Culture/305
the largest. The conidiophores generally resemble that of Penicillium and thus are described
pencillafe, or brush shaped.

as

History, Use and/or Medical Implications: One species toxic to humans: Scopulariopsis
brevicaulis (Saccardo) Brainer. This species usually attacks tissue already diseased by other microorganisms. It is an improbable threat to the health of mushroom cultivators.

Comments: Scopulariopsis fimicola is the White Plaster Mold seen on compost beds. It is very detrimental to the growth of mushroom mycelia. Its presence is usually an indication of a short, wet
and over-mature compost. This condition predisposes the compost to a difficult Phase II with dense
anaerobic areas, ammonia-lock and consequently high pH levels. All these factors contribute to the
growth and spread of Scopulariopsis fimicola, the species of White Plaster Mold most frequently
seen in mushroom culture.
Contamination can also arise from within the mushroom house if there has been a prior history
of problems with this contaminant and if strict contamination control procedures have not been instigated. Not surprisingly, one often finds Scopulariopsis with the Inky Cap (a Coprinus species)
which is also associated with residual ammonia in composts.

See also Papulospora (P. byssina Hots.), a genus containing the Brown Plaster Mold whose
early stages of growth resemble the White Plaster Mold.

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