The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home

Paul Stamets. The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home. - Agarikon press, 1983

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Содержание

FOREWORD by Dr. Andrew Weil

PREFACE

I. INTRODUCTION TO MUSHROOM CULTURE

II. STERILE TECHNIQUE AND AGAR CULTURE

III. GRAIN CULTURE

IV. THE MUSHROOM GROWING ROOM

V. COMPOST PREPARATION

VI. NON-COMPOSTED SUBSTRATES

VII. SPAWNING AND SPAWN RUNNING IN BULK SUBSTRATES

VIII. THE CASING LAYER

IX. STRATEGIES FOR MUSHROOM FORMATION (PINHEAD INITIATION)

X. ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS: SUSTAINING THE MUSHROOM CROP

XL GROWING PARAMETERS FOR VARIOUS MUSHROOM SPECIES

XII. CULTIVATION PROBLEMS AND THEIR SOLUTIONS: A TROUBLESHOOTING GUIDE

XIII. THE CONTAMINANTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE: IDENTIFICATION AND CONTROL

XIV. THE PESTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE

XV. MUSHROOM GENETICS

APPENDICES

GLOSSARY

BIBLIOGRAPHY

INDEX

PHOTOGRAPHY AND ILLUSTRATION CREDITS

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

OCR
304/The Mushroom Cultivator

SCOPULARIOPSIS
Class: Fungi Imperlecti
Order: Moniliales
Series: Annelosporae

Common Names: White

Plaster Mold;

Flour Mold.

Latin Root: From "scopulatus" meaning
broom-like or brush shaped, in reference to
the structure of the sporulating reproductive
body.

Habitat & Frequency of Occurrence: A

Figure 221 Drawing of sporulating structure typical of Scopulariopsis.

saprophyte, occasionally seen in composts
that have been over-watered or are too high
in nitrogen. Scopulariopsis also forms on the
casing during the fruiting cycle. It naturally
grows in soils, on hay, on rotting leaves and
on other decaying plant material including
grain. This group of molds generally prefer
an alkaline pH.

Medium Through Which Contamination Is Spread: Primarily airborne spores, spent compost
and insects; and from materials previously in contact with this contaminant that were not thoroughly
cleaned before use.
Measures of Control: Proper preparation and sufficient air during Phase II composting discour-

ages this fungus. Atkins (1 974) reported that excessive moisture and subsequent anaerobic
pasteurization were the two main factors contributing to the spread of the White Plaster Mold. Before filling, the addition of gypsum to an overly wet compost will bind loose water, a condition

favorable to this mold.
Macroscopic Appearance: Circular colonies of densely matted, whitish mycelia; with age developing slight pinkish tones. This mold often appears as "splotches", mostly on the compost bed and
to a lesser degree on the casing soil.

Microscopic Characteristics: Conidiophores short, soon branching, delineating into several
elongated cells which then give rise to short chains of globose, hyaline, finely warted, dry conidia
that measure 5-8 x 5-7 microns. Annular zonations are present at the junction of the sporogenous
cells and the first spore in the conidial chain. Terminal cells in the chain are the oldest and typically

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