The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home

Paul Stamets. The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home. - Agarikon press, 1983

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Содержание

FOREWORD by Dr. Andrew Weil

PREFACE

I. INTRODUCTION TO MUSHROOM CULTURE

II. STERILE TECHNIQUE AND AGAR CULTURE

III. GRAIN CULTURE

IV. THE MUSHROOM GROWING ROOM

V. COMPOST PREPARATION

VI. NON-COMPOSTED SUBSTRATES

VII. SPAWNING AND SPAWN RUNNING IN BULK SUBSTRATES

VIII. THE CASING LAYER

IX. STRATEGIES FOR MUSHROOM FORMATION (PINHEAD INITIATION)

X. ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS: SUSTAINING THE MUSHROOM CROP

XL GROWING PARAMETERS FOR VARIOUS MUSHROOM SPECIES

XII. CULTIVATION PROBLEMS AND THEIR SOLUTIONS: A TROUBLESHOOTING GUIDE

XIII. THE CONTAMINANTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE: IDENTIFICATION AND CONTROL

XIV. THE PESTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE

XV. MUSHROOM GENETICS

APPENDICES

GLOSSARY

BIBLIOGRAPHY

INDEX

PHOTOGRAPHY AND ILLUSTRATION CREDITS

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

OCR
298/The Mushroom Cultivator

PAPULOSPORA
Class: Fungi Imperlecti
Order: Mycelia Sterilia
Common Name: Brown Plaster Mold.

Latin Root: From "papulosus" meaning
pimple-like and "spora" or spore. Named in
reference to the rounded groups of cells that
resemble sclerotia and are characteristic of
this genus.

Habitat & Frequency of Occurrence: A
saprophyte, common on overly mature composts or on compost with excessive moisture.

Some species grow directly on the wood

Figure 216

Drawing of non-sporulating
scierotia-like mycelial mass that is typical of
the Brown Plaster Mold, Papulospora
byssina.

used in the construction of the trays and then
spread to the beds.

Medium Through Which Contamination Is Spread: Primarily air; from spent
compost; or from untreated trays that once
harbored this contaminant.

Measures of Control: Avoidance of over-composting; proper balancing of moisture in the compost; expeditious removal of old or contaminated compost; steam cleaning of trays; and maintaining
good hygiene between crops.

Macroscopic Appearance: Dense whitish mycelium, resembling Scopu/ariopsis uimicola (the
White Plaster Mold) in the early stages, soon becoming cinnamon brown from small bead-like or
"powdery" sclerotia-like balls of cells. The balls of cells are easily seen with a hand lens and are
darkly pigmented. Often there is a whitish rim of new growth along the outer periphery of the mycehum.

Microscopic Characteristics: True conidia absent, propagating through simple fragmentation of
mycelia or through dense spherical sclerotia-like masses of dark cells.

History, Use and/or Medical implications: None known.
Comments: Papulospora is competitive to mushroom mycelium and can therefore postpone or
inhibit fruiting. Papulospora byssina Hotson is the brown plaster mold commonly encountered in
mushroom cultivation. Colonies of this contaminant can grow up to several feet in diameter if cor-

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