The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home

Paul Stamets. The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home. - Agarikon press, 1983

: [url=http://txt.drevle.com/text/stamets-mushroom_cultivator-a_practical_guide-1983/317]Paul Stamets. The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home. - Agarikon press, 1983[/url]
 

Содержание

FOREWORD by Dr. Andrew Weil

PREFACE

I. INTRODUCTION TO MUSHROOM CULTURE

II. STERILE TECHNIQUE AND AGAR CULTURE

III. GRAIN CULTURE

IV. THE MUSHROOM GROWING ROOM

V. COMPOST PREPARATION

VI. NON-COMPOSTED SUBSTRATES

VII. SPAWNING AND SPAWN RUNNING IN BULK SUBSTRATES

VIII. THE CASING LAYER

IX. STRATEGIES FOR MUSHROOM FORMATION (PINHEAD INITIATION)

X. ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS: SUSTAINING THE MUSHROOM CROP

XL GROWING PARAMETERS FOR VARIOUS MUSHROOM SPECIES

XII. CULTIVATION PROBLEMS AND THEIR SOLUTIONS: A TROUBLESHOOTING GUIDE

XIII. THE CONTAMINANTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE: IDENTIFICATION AND CONTROL

XIV. THE PESTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE

XV. MUSHROOM GENETICS

APPENDICES

GLOSSARY

BIBLIOGRAPHY

INDEX

PHOTOGRAPHY AND ILLUSTRATION CREDITS

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

OCR
The Contaminants of Mushroom Culture/295

large and rough walled, often adorned with short spine-like projections, and which is attached to a
smaller cup shaped smooth cell. The second conidial type is smaller, ellipsoid, unicellular and develops apically from the ends of Verticillium-like conidiophores.

History, Use and/or Medical Implications: Not known to be pathogenic to man or animals.
Comments: Mycogone perniciosa Magnus is the species in the genus responsible for attacking
the mushroom crop. Its mycelia intergrows with mushroom mycelia, according Kneebone (1961).
This is a vigorous and resilient contaminant. Its spores are killed at 1 20 O F. when exposed to moist
heat (pasteurization) for 24 hours. Isolation of contaminated mushrooms, increasing ventilation,
lowering temperature and proper bed cleaning techniques all limit the spread of Mycogone.
Kneebone recommends the use of chlorinated water (150 ppm) during normal crop watering to impede the germination of its spores.
Harvey et al. 1 982, noted that if Mycogone appears during the first flush, then its spores were
probably introduced via the casing—either at the time of its application or during spawn run through
it, a period of about two weeks. Later infestations are more probably spread by flies, workers, air currents or other means.

Mycogone is believed by some mycologists to be an imperfect form of Hypomyces, an
ascomycetous fungus that parasitizes wild mushrooms, especially Russula and Lactarius.
See also Verticillium and Dactylium.

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