The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home

Paul Stamets. The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home. - Agarikon press, 1983

: [url=http://txt.drevle.com/text/stamets-mushroom_cultivator-a_practical_guide-1983/309]Paul Stamets. The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home. - Agarikon press, 1983[/url]
 

Содержание

FOREWORD by Dr. Andrew Weil

PREFACE

I. INTRODUCTION TO MUSHROOM CULTURE

II. STERILE TECHNIQUE AND AGAR CULTURE

III. GRAIN CULTURE

IV. THE MUSHROOM GROWING ROOM

V. COMPOST PREPARATION

VI. NON-COMPOSTED SUBSTRATES

VII. SPAWNING AND SPAWN RUNNING IN BULK SUBSTRATES

VIII. THE CASING LAYER

IX. STRATEGIES FOR MUSHROOM FORMATION (PINHEAD INITIATION)

X. ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS: SUSTAINING THE MUSHROOM CROP

XL GROWING PARAMETERS FOR VARIOUS MUSHROOM SPECIES

XII. CULTIVATION PROBLEMS AND THEIR SOLUTIONS: A TROUBLESHOOTING GUIDE

XIII. THE CONTAMINANTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE: IDENTIFICATION AND CONTROL

XIV. THE PESTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE

XV. MUSHROOM GENETICS

APPENDICES

GLOSSARY

BIBLIOGRAPHY

INDEX

PHOTOGRAPHY AND ILLUSTRATION CREDITS

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

OCR
The Contaminants of Mushroom Culture/287

Comments: Humicola plays an important role in the conversion of the nitrogen in ammonia into
protein rich compounds that the mushroom mycelia can digest. In this regard Humicola is an ally to
the compost preparation process. Compost makers have long believed that Humicola nigrescens
should be encouraged to grow during Phase II because a compost colonized with it resulted in
higher yields. Humicola prospers in the 115-125 (1 30)°F. range. When the finished compost has
been brought down to spawning temperature, these fungi are rendered inactive, and are then consumed by the mushroom mycelium.

On grain Hum/cola grisea is most frequently seen; on horse manure/straw composts
Humicola nigrescens is most commonly encountered. Humicola that occurs during cropping does
not seem to pose a serious threat to the overall crop.
Most species are mesophilic; some are thermophilic; and all are saprophytic. Hum/cola is not a
problem contaminant.

See Torula, another therm ophilic fungus beneficial to composting.
For

more information consult:

Bels-Koning, H.C., Gerrits, J.P.G., and Vaandrager, M.H. 1962. "Some Fungi Appearing
Towards the End of Composting," Mushroom Science V.

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