The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home

Paul Stamets. The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home. - Agarikon press, 1983

: [url=http://txt.drevle.com/text/stamets-mushroom_cultivator-a_practical_guide-1983/304]Paul Stamets. The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home. - Agarikon press, 1983[/url]
 

Содержание

FOREWORD by Dr. Andrew Weil

PREFACE

I. INTRODUCTION TO MUSHROOM CULTURE

II. STERILE TECHNIQUE AND AGAR CULTURE

III. GRAIN CULTURE

IV. THE MUSHROOM GROWING ROOM

V. COMPOST PREPARATION

VI. NON-COMPOSTED SUBSTRATES

VII. SPAWNING AND SPAWN RUNNING IN BULK SUBSTRATES

VIII. THE CASING LAYER

IX. STRATEGIES FOR MUSHROOM FORMATION (PINHEAD INITIATION)

X. ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS: SUSTAINING THE MUSHROOM CROP

XL GROWING PARAMETERS FOR VARIOUS MUSHROOM SPECIES

XII. CULTIVATION PROBLEMS AND THEIR SOLUTIONS: A TROUBLESHOOTING GUIDE

XIII. THE CONTAMINANTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE: IDENTIFICATION AND CONTROL

XIV. THE PESTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE

XV. MUSHROOM GENETICS

APPENDICES

GLOSSARY

BIBLIOGRAPHY

INDEX

PHOTOGRAPHY AND ILLUSTRATION CREDITS

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

OCR
282/The Mushroom Cultivator

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Figure 204 Light micrograph of Fusarium conidia. Note multicelled macroconidia and single celled microconidia.
history Fusarium molds have been responsible for diseases of major proportions. Usually the cause
has been bread made from poorly wintered grain. In regions of the Ukraine, Eastern Siberia and
central Asia, the disease caused by this fungus was called "Staggering Sickness" for its symptoms

of vertigo, bleeding, headaches, chills and nausea. In a Soviet province during World War II, a
single outbreak caused the deaths of nearly 30,000 people.
Given their past, it is not surprising to learn these fungi have aifracted the interest of the military.

In 1980 and 1981, the United States government accused the Soviet Union of embarking on a
new variation of biochemical warfare when leaf and twig specimens allegedly brought from the war
zones of Cambodia and Afghanistan were found laden with high concentrations of toxins from these
species. The most prominent species producing these toxins (the trichothecenes) are Fusarium
sporothrichiodes and Fusarium poae, although other Fusaria are also virulent. Fusarium poae is a
violet colored contaminant occasionally encountered in mushroom spawn production. See Comments below.
Because there are many toxic species in the genus, one should treat all Fusarium contaminants
with due caution.

Comments: Fusarium may be a cause of mushroom "aborts". In one study, English researchers

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