The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home

Paul Stamets. The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home. - Agarikon press, 1983

: [url=http://txt.drevle.com/text/stamets-mushroom_cultivator-a_practical_guide-1983/30]Paul Stamets. The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home. - Agarikon press, 1983[/url]
 

Содержание

FOREWORD by Dr. Andrew Weil

PREFACE

I. INTRODUCTION TO MUSHROOM CULTURE

II. STERILE TECHNIQUE AND AGAR CULTURE

III. GRAIN CULTURE

IV. THE MUSHROOM GROWING ROOM

V. COMPOST PREPARATION

VI. NON-COMPOSTED SUBSTRATES

VII. SPAWNING AND SPAWN RUNNING IN BULK SUBSTRATES

VIII. THE CASING LAYER

IX. STRATEGIES FOR MUSHROOM FORMATION (PINHEAD INITIATION)

X. ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS: SUSTAINING THE MUSHROOM CROP

XL GROWING PARAMETERS FOR VARIOUS MUSHROOM SPECIES

XII. CULTIVATION PROBLEMS AND THEIR SOLUTIONS: A TROUBLESHOOTING GUIDE

XIII. THE CONTAMINANTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE: IDENTIFICATION AND CONTROL

XIV. THE PESTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE

XV. MUSHROOM GENETICS

APPENDICES

GLOSSARY

BIBLIOGRAPHY

INDEX

PHOTOGRAPHY AND ILLUSTRATION CREDITS

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

OCR
16/The Mushroom Cultivator

T

he air we breathe is a living sea of microscopic organisms that ebbs and flows with the slightest
wind currents. Fungi, bacteria, viruses and plants use the atmosphere to carry their offspring to
new environments. These microscopic particles can make sterile technique difficult unless proper
precautions are taken. If one can eliminate or reduce the movement of these organisms in the air,

however, success in sterile technique is assured.

There are five primary sources of contamination in mushroom culture work:

1. The immediate external environment
2. The culture medium
3. The culturing equipment
4. The cultivator and his or her clothes
5. The mushroom spores or the mycelium
Mushrooms—and all living organisms—are in constant competition for available nutrients. In
creating a sterile environment, the cultivator seeks to give advantage to the mushroom over the
myriad legions of other competitors. Before culture work can begin, the first step is the construction
of an inoculation chamber or sterile laboratory.

DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION OF
A STERILE LABORATORY
The majority of cultivators fail because they do not take the time to construct a laboratory for
sterile work. An afternoon's work is usually all that is required to convert a walk-in closet, a pantry or
a small storage room into a workable inoculation chamber.
Begin by removing all rugs, curtains and other cloth-like material that can harbor dust and
spores. Thoroughly clean the floors, walls and ceiling with a mild disinfectant. Painting the room
with a high gloss white enamel will make future cleaning easier. Cover windows or any other
sources of potential air leaks with plastic sheeting. On either side of the room's entrance, using plastic sheeting or other materials, construct an antechamber which serves as an airlock. This acts as a
protective buffer between the laboratory and the outside environment. The chamber should be designed so that the sterile room door is closed while the anteroom is entered. Equip the lab with these
items:

a chair and a sturdy table with a smooth surface
2. a propane torch, an alcohol lamp, a bunsen burner or a butane lighter.
3. a clearly marked spray bottle containing a 10% bleach solution.
1.

4. sterile petri dishes and test tube "slants".
5. stick-on labels, notebook, ballpoint pen and a permanent marking pen.

6. an agar knife and inoculating loop.
All these items should remain in the laboratory. If any equipment is removed, make sure it
absolutely clean before being returned to the room.

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